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Spotlight On: Vera Zurbrügg, MA Photojournalism and Documentary Photography – LCC Postgraduate Shows 2019

Photo of a historic building with gold layered over the image.
Photo of a historic building with gold layered over the image.
Image © Vera Zurbrügg
Written by
Jake May
Published date
01 November 2019

Students from MA Photojournalism and Documentary Photography will be exhibiting an array of innovative and boundary-pushing projects to prospective employers, industry, the public, and friends and family, as part of LCC Postgraduate Shows 2019.

The course will be showing in LCC Postgraduate Shows 2019: Show 1 alongside students across publishing, arts and lifestyle journalism, advertising and photography, with a Launch Event on 13 November and exhibiting from 14–16 November.

Get an idea of what to expect at LCC Postgraduate Shows 2019 as we shine a spotlight on just a handful of the projects set to go on show from the next generation of leading creatives spanning the always-evolving disciplines of design, media and screen...

Vera Zurbrügg

Silence Is Golden

Photo of a historic building with gold layered over the image.
Image © Vera Zurbrügg

In Vera's words...

"'Silence Is Golden' is a multimedia installation which engages with the different aspects of state secrecy and concealment of information in the context of the gold trades between the Swiss National Bank and the Third Reich and its direct effect on the people.

"Switzerland was the primary hub for the Nazis to exchange gold for hard currencies to buy goods for their warfare. Some of this gold had a specific provenance: it was composed of the remelted property of prisoners of concentration camps. These gold bars are known as victim gold.

"Documents show that in 1943 the Swiss National Bank had the suspicion that the German gold came from Nazi-occupied territories and was being confiscated by the Reichsbank in gross violation of international law. Nevertheless, the Swiss National Bank kept accepting gold until 1945.

"After the war, these victim gold bars were then presumably used for the minting of an iconic Swiss gold coin, the ‘Vreneli’. This coin is mainly given as a gift for special occasions such as baptisms or significant birthdays.

"Through the withholding of information, buyers of such gold coins were unknowingly complicit in the morally questionable deals between the Swiss National Bank and the Nazis."

View Vera's website or follow Vera on Instagram to find out more.


LCC Postgraduate Shows 2019: Show 1 takes place from 14 – 16 November.

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