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Postgraduate

M ARCH: Architecture

Colourful graphic drawing of building with people walking around
Olivia Chester – Commons Ecologies - Credit: Image courtesy of UAL
College
Central Saint Martins
Start date
October 2021
Course length
Two years (79 weeks)
Extended full-time

In a world where established customs, systems and structures are increasingly unstable, we need a different kind of architectural thinking.

On M ARCH: Architecture, you will address the challenges of contemporary society through the built environment. This course is part of the Spatial Practices programme.

Why choose this course at Central Saint Martins

  • Part 2 qualification: The course provides you with the second degree in the professional pathway toward registration as an architect – commonly referred to as Part 2.
  • Professional practice: As part of your studies you are required to undertake 10 weeks of industry placement. This will give you the opportunity to engage with both existing forms of practice and to consider new ways of working.
  • Local and industry engagement: The course offers opportunities to work closely with communities, clients and social enterprise projects. This will allow you to consider new approaches to your role as an architect.
  • Collaboration: Working in teams and across disciplines is at the heart of the learning and teaching experience on M ARCH: Architecture.

Open days

The next open days will be scheduled from November 2020 to March 2021. Please check back here by October 2020 to book online.

Scholarships, awards and funding

Jane Rapley Scholarships

UAL UK/EU Postgraduate Scholarships
UAL International Postgraduate £5,000 Scholarships
UAL International Postgraduate £30,000 Scholarships and ISH accommodation award

Student work

  • 01_Rallou-Grigoropoulou_Collectively-Industrial_Credit-Rallou-Grigoropoulou-CSM_MArch_Website-Update-2019.jpg
    Rallou Grigoropoulou - Collectively Industrial (Credit: Rallou Grigoropoulou)
  • 05_Lois-Innes_Brent-Cross-South-Cooperative_-Credit-Lois-Innes-CSM_MArch_Website-Update-2019.jpg
    Lois Innes - Brent Cross South Cooperative (Credit: Lois Innes)
  • 09_Grizedale-Arts_Information-kiosk-and-a-community-bread-oven_Credit-Takeshi-Hayatsu-CSM_MArch_Website-Update-2019.jpg
    Grizedale Arts -Information kiosk and a community bread oven (Credit: Takeshi Hayatsu)
  • 13_Neba-Sere_Alternative-Housing-Models-in-Lewisham_Credit-Neba-Sere-CSM_MArch_Website-Update-2019.jpg
    Neba Sere - Alternative Housing Models in Lewisham (Credit: Neba Sere)
  • 02_Filippa-Hellsten_Permanent-Meanwhile_-Credit-Filippa-Hellsten-CSM_MArch_Website-Update-2019.jpg
    Filippa Hellsten - Permanent Meanwhile (Credit: Filippa Hellsten)
  • 06_Moetaz-Fathalla_Reclaiming-the-Hoarding_Credit-Moetaz-Fathalla-CSM_MArch_Website-Update-2019.jpg
    Moetaz Fathalla - Reclaiming the Hoarding (Credit: Moetaz Fathalla)

Matthew Brown: Performance Planning

Course catalogues

Architecture stories

  • Class of 2020: Deans' Awards

    Since 1989, the CSM Museum & Study Collection has actively purchased works from graduating students. Now, after more than 30 years, the process has taken on a new form in our first ever Deans’ Awards.

  • Shortlist for MullenLowe NOVA Awards 2020 announced

    Today we are happy to announce the graduating students shortlisted for this year's MullenLowe NOVA Awards and declare voting open for the YourNOVA Award.

  • Class of 2020: Waste at Work

    From unwanted food to industrial byproducts, we are producing waste at an alarming rate. Many of our graduating students are rethinking waste as raw material and here, we speak to just a few of them.

  • Class of 2020: Nature Speaks

    As the climate emergency emphasises just how dysfunctional our collective relationship with nature truly is, we take a look at graduating work – spanning from a biocomputer to a gull costume – that gives nature a voice.

Facilities

Course overview

At Central Saint Martins, M ARCH: Architecture draws on the dynamic design thinking and making skills from different practices. This ranges from art to curation, graphic communication design to fashion and performance to product design. On this course, you will develop new insights, solutions and methods to explore new forms of architecture. Through research and intervention, you will address the challenges of a rapidly changing urban environment.  

The course focuses on the needs of a wide range of participants in the human environment. Architects can play a crucial role in supporting communities and individuals. With a certain approach, they can help them benefit from change in the urban landscape. Through collaborative engagement with local users, architects can empower communities to become active participants in the process of development. This builds cultural and social, as well as economic, capital. M ARCH: Architecture shifts the emphasis from the design of physical space alone, to interventions in its production. You will address this through live projects which engage with the reality of cities and their citizens. You will learn the constraints and conditions of designing in the real world.  

Large-scale, master-plan developments in urban centres are only the more visible forms of change within the city. While these may create economic benefit, their long-term sustainability can be limited. Carefully defined, small-scale interventions can also lead to dramatic and large transformations. These can be sustained over longer periods, as they may better serve multiple stakeholders. For the future architect, skills that foster and guide innovation will be of greatest value. On M ARCH: Architecture, you will gain the design skills to create sustainable transformations in the urban environment. You will learn to recognise the potential of architecture at different scales and modes of operation – whether in driving small-scale design transformations, or enabling large-scale development.

Course units

The increasing complexity of contemporary socio-economic, cultural and environmental issues requires architects to develop a broad skill set. This may be described as context-led – seeking solutions which address local issues arising from global agendas. Architects must move beyond traditional disciplinary boundaries to find innovative and sustainable design solutions. There is a growing need for contemporary city design which focuses not only on "hard" infrastructure but also the "softer". That is, not only buildings, transport and engineering but also systems of social networks, organisation and human interaction.  

On M ARCH: Architecture, you will undertake three core design units. These are combined with an industry-embedded placement. You will also be supported to plan, develop and complete an independent major project. You will explore strong social, political and material engagement with the world. This may be facilitated through external partnerships and multidisciplinary collaboration. 

Unit 1: Methodologies for Architectural Engagement

Through a series of projects, you will experiment with multidisciplinary approaches. You will develop methodologies for public engagement with architecture – ones that expand and challenge the conventional role of the architecture. You will test and refine these approaches through design propositions. You will be introduced to a variety of research methods and issues relevant to the discipline. You will then implement these through realised design work. While working on this unit you will also research and secure and industry placement to be undertaken in Unit 2. 

Unit 2: Design Research in Architectural Practice

In this unit, you will define your own direction, including an industry placement or an in depth industry case study. Working with your advisor, you will work with or study a selected practice. You will assess the nature of their practice and projects. At the same time, you will research and develop opportunities for your own self-directed design project. You will define your own brief, based on research and analysis of a chosen site. You will develop a clear brief and a schematic design proposal which will be resolved in Unit 4. 

Unit 3: Constructing in Detail

This unit provides an opportunity to explore technical aspects of making and construction in close detail. You will engage with the conditions and constraints of structural, constructional and material systems. This will occur through a constructional prototyping project. Unit 3 will involve research and testing, collaborative teamwork and constructional implementation. It will primarily involve working as part of a team. 

Unit 4: Innovating in Architectural Practice 2

You will continue to work on your major project. You will resolve it as an architectural proposal. If appropriate, you will also implement aspects of this proposal on site or with collaborators and partners. 

Unit 5: Reflecting on Professional Practice

This unit is a culmination to the course and follows the completion of your major project. You will rehearse the integration of key areas through professional reporting. As a follow on from Unit 2, you will be asked to apply the technical and professional knowledge gained so far. You will demonstrate your understanding of the complexity of practice through a reflection on your own major project. This unit aims to simulate the demands and regulatory controls that professional practice is subject to. These include planning, building control, cost, contract, consultancy and constructional documentation. 

Mode of study

M ARCH: Architecture is offered in extended full-time mode which runs for 79 weeks over two academic years. You will be expected to commit 30 hours per week to study which includes teaching time and independent study.  

The course has been designed in this way to enable you to pursue studies, while also undertaking part-time employment, internships or care responsibilities.

Credit and award requirements

The course is credit-rated at 240 credits.

On successfully completing the course, you will gain a Master of Architecture (M ARCH degree).  

Under the Framework for Higher Education Qualifications, an M ARCH is Level 7. All units must be passed in order to achieve the M ARCH but the classification of the award is derived from the marks for the second, fourth and fifth units.  

If you are unable to continue on the course, a Postgraduate Certificate (PG Cert) will normally be offered following the successful completion of 60 credits, or a Postgraduate Diploma (PG Dip) following the successful completion of 120 credits.  

M ARCH: Architecture is professionally validated by the RIBA. Successful completion of the course provides RIBA Part 2 qualification, the second of three stages of RIBA professional registration.  

Please note that as a result of course specific regulations, unit compensation as detailed in UAL Course Regulations, is not available to students on this course. 

Learning and teaching methods

During your course you will engage with learning and teaching that includes both online and face-to-face modes. Typically, this will include:

  • Unit and project briefings 
  • Set and self-initiated project briefs 
  • Inductions, lectures and seminars 
  • Collaborative workshops and interdisciplinary study teams 
  • Peer learning 
  • Self and peer assessment 
  • Guest speakers 
  • Group discussions, reviews and critiques 
  • Working with clients on live projects 
  • Mentoring 
  • Independent study

Assessment methods

  • Portfolio 
  • Essay writing 
  • Placement report 
  • Project brief 
  • Prototypes 
  • Technical and constructional diary 
  • Professional practice diary 
  • Major project

Staff

Andreas  Lang

Andreas Lang

Course Leader, M ARCH: Architecture

Jayden  Ali

Jayden Ali

Unit Leader, M ARCH: Architecture

Jeremy  Till

Jeremy Till

Head of Central Saint Martins and Pro-Vice Chancellor of the University of the Arts

Unit 1 Tutors

Julia King
Verity-Jane Keefe
Sven Mündner
Cecily Chua
Joseph Henry
Ellie Howard
Tom Dyckhoff (History and Theory)

Unit 2 Tutors

Hester Buck
Maria Westerståhl
Mathew Leung
Ulrike Steven
Tom Dyckhoff (History and Theory)

Unit 3 Tutors

Paloma Gormley
Summer Islam

Unit 4 Tutors

Maria Westerståhl
Mathew Leung
Ulrike Steven
Takeshi Hayatsu
Tom Dyckhoff (History and Theory)

Unit 5 Tutors

Diana Ibáñez López
David Knight (Engineer)
Chris Stobbart (Engineer)

Professor: Liza Fior

How to apply

Opportunities for all

We are committed to making university education an achievable option for a wider range of people and to supporting all of our students in achieving their potential both during and after their courses.

We welcome applications from people with disabilities. If you have a disability (e.g. mobility difficulties, sensory impairments, medical or mental health conditions or Asperger’s syndrome) we strongly encourage you to contact us on disability@arts.ac.uk or +44 (0)20 7514 6156 so that we can plan the right support for you. All enquiries are treated confidentially. To find out more, visit our Disability & Dyslexia webpages.

Entry requirements

The standard entry requirements for this course are as follows:

  • An upper second class honours degree from an Architects Registration Board (ARB) prescribed course in architecture 
  • Or an equivalent EU / international qualification 
  • Or a professional qualification recognised as equivalent to an honours degree

And normally at least one year of relevant internship or, professional experience.

English language requirements

IELTS score of 6.5 or above, with at least 5.5 in reading, writing, listening and speaking (please check our main English language requirements webpage).

Selection criteria

This course believes that the people who design the built environment should be as eclectic a group as those who use it. As such, we welcome submissions from applicants from diverse backgrounds.

We select applicants according to potential and current ability in the following areas:

  • Demonstrable interest, commitment and motivation in exploring personal (research) agendas/interests. 
  • Ability to creatively respond to a design problem. 
  • Knowledge of the Architectural profession’s obligation to society, technology and the environment.
  • Showing that your personal and professional aspirations are compatible with the aims and objectives of the course;
  • Ability to effectively communicate your design ideas, processes and proposals via a range of media, including CAD, model making and presentation skills.

Making your application

You should apply by clicking on the link to the direct form below. The application form can be saved as you fill it out, so you do not need to complete it all at once. You will also have the chance to review all the information and make any necessary amendments before you submit the application form.

Deferred entry

Central Saint Martins does not accept applications for deferred entry. You should therefore apply in the year you wish to study.

Transfers

If you are currently studying at another institution and if you have successfully completed 60 credits in the equivalent units and modules on your current postgraduate course and wish to continue your studies at Central Saint Martins, you can apply to transfer. The Admissions Tutor will consider applications on a case by case basis, subject to places being available. You must apply directly to the course via the course webpage as early as possible.

Please check our Student Transfer Policy for more important information and be ready to provide us with your current course handbook and unit transcripts.

You will need to provide an official document (translated into English) from your current university, explaining the learning outcomes of the units you have completed.

Start your application now

Before you apply, please take time to read the guidance below. You will be asked to provide the following information when completing the online application form:

General information

Personal details (including legal full name, date of birth, nationality, addresses)

Current English language level

Current and/or previous education and qualification details

Employment history

Personal statement

Your personal statement should give us information about yourself and why you want to join the course (between 300-500 words) and should include:

  • What are you doing at the moment educationally, professionally, personally?
  • Why do you wish to study on this course?
  • What is your relevant experience?
  • Do you have any relevant skills?
  • Why do you think you are a suitable candidate for acceptance?

We cannot consider your application if you do not provide all the information above.

Communicating with you

After you have successfully submitted your application, you will receive an email confirming we have successfully received your application and providing you with your login details for the UAL Portal.  We will request any additional information from you, including inviting you to upload documents / portfolio / book an interview, through the portal.  You should check your UAL Portal regularly for any important updates and requests.

Please add csm.ukeu@arts.ac.uk to your contacts to ensure that you do not miss any important updates re: your application to UAL.  Also consider altering your spam or junk mail filter to ensure that emails from @arts.ac.uk get through to you.

Application deadline

15 May 2021

We recommend you apply as soon as possible before this date, for equal consideration. We may still be able to accept applications after this date, depending on availability.

When you’ll hear from us

Once you’ve sent in your application, this will be sent through to our course teams for review. We’ll be in touch shortly after you apply with information about next steps. Find out more about what happens after you apply.

There are two ways international students can apply:

  • One of our official representatives in your country
  • A direct application.

If you are applying directly you click on the link to the direct form below. The application form can be saved as you fill it out, so you do not need to complete it all at once. You will also have the chance to review all the information and make any necessary amendments before you submit the application form.

Deferred entry

Central Saint Martins does not accept applications for deferred entry. You should therefore apply in the year you wish to study.

Transfers

If you are currently studying at another institution and if you have successfully completed 60 credits in the equivalent units and modules on your current postgraduate course and wish to continue your studies at Central Saint Martins, you can apply to transfer. The Admissions Tutor will consider applications on a case by case basis, subject to places being available. You must apply directly to the course via the course webpage as early as possible.

Please check our Student Transfer Policy for more important information and be ready to provide us with your current course handbook and unit transcripts.

You will need to provide an official document (translated into English) from your current university, explaining the learning outcomes of the units you have completed.

Start your application now

Before you apply, please take time to read the guidance below. You will be asked to provide the following information when completing the online application form:

General information

Personal details (including legal full name, date of birth, nationality, addresses)

Current English language level

Current and/or previous education and qualification details

Employment history

Personal statement

Your personal statement should give us information about yourself and why you want to join the course (between 300-500 words) and should include:

  • What are you doing at the moment educationally, professionally, personally?
  • Why do you wish to study on this course?
  • What is your relevant experience?
  • Do you have any relevant skills?
  • Why do you think you are a suitable candidate for acceptance?

Immigration history check

Whether you are applying online or through a UAL representative you will need to complete an immigration history check to establish whether you are eligible to study at UAL.  If you do not complete the check we will not be able to proceed with your application.

We cannot consider your application if you do not provide all the information above.

Communicating with you

After you have successfully submitted your application, you will receive an email confirming we have successfully received your application and providing you with your login details for the UAL Portal.  We will request any additional information from you, including inviting you to upload documents / portfolio / book an interview, through the portal. You should check your UAL Portal regularly for any important updates and requests.

Please add csm.international@arts.ac.uk to your contacts to ensure that you do not miss any important updates re: your application to UAL  Also consider altering your spam or junk mail filter to ensure that emails from @arts.ac.uk get through to you.

Application deadline

15 May 2021

We recommend you apply as soon as possible before this date, for equal consideration. We may still be able to accept applications after this date, depending on availability.

When you’ll hear from us

Once you’ve sent in your application, this will be sent through to our course teams for review. We’ll be in touch shortly after you apply with information about next steps. Find out more about what happens after you apply.


After you apply

What happens next

Initial application check

We check your application to see if you meet the standard entry requirements for the course.  If you do, you will be invited to submit a portfolio through the UAL Portal.

Portfolio review

You will need to submit a digital portfolio of up to 20 images with supporting work illustrating your previous experience and practical skills.

The only files that can be uploaded as part of the portfolio are:

  • Images: bmp, gif, jpg, jpeg, png
  • Audio: mp3, mp4, ogg, wav, wma
  • Video: avi, mp4, mpg, mpeg, mkv, mov, wmv

Portfolio advice

Your portfolio should demonstrate creative development, whether for a college project or in your personal work. By creative development, we mean ideas that have originated through your own experience and research and progressed towards potential visual proposals. Ideas, visual research and experimentation are more important than finished design solutions and can be shown in 2D work, or through photos of 3D objects and maquettes.

It is important that the creative work you include reflects and demonstrates your thinking, initiative and personal commitment to a particular project, theme or idea.  We are interested in you as an individual, your personal interests, your creativity and initiative in finding out about your proposed area of study. We would also like to know about your favourite designers and artists, where you have seen their work at first hand and how you have acquired more information about the work that interests you.

For more portfolio advice please visit the Portfolio advice page.

Following the review of the portfolio we select a small number of applicants to move on to the next stage of the process.  These applicants will be invited to an interview.

Interview

The interview typically lasts approximately 20 minutes.  As part of the interview you will be asked to choose and present one of your projects from your portfolio.  Interviews take place online or by telephone.

How we notify you of the outcome of your application

You will receive the outcome of your application through the UAL Portal.

Fees and funding

Home fee

£8,415

This fee is correct for 2021/22 entry and is subject to change for 2022/23 entry. Tuition fees may increase in future years for new and continuing students on courses lasting more than one year. For this course, you can pay tuition fees in instalments.

Home fees are currently charged to UK resident nationals. However, the rules are complex and you can find out more on our tuition fees pages.

From 2021/22 entry, most EU students will be charged the International tuition fee rate, although this may depend on your individual circumstances. If you started your course in October 2020  or earlier, you’ll continue to pay Home (UK) fees for the duration of your course. Read more advice for EU students on our Brexit information webpage

International fee

£19,620

This fee is correct for 2021/22 entry and is subject to change for 2022/23 entry. Tuition fees for international students may increase by up to 5% in each future year of your course.  For this course, you can pay tuition fees in instalments.

International fees are currently charged to students from countries outside of the UK. However, the rules are complex and more information can be found on our tuition fees pages.

From 2021/22 entry, most EU students will be charged the International tuition fee rate, although this may depend on your individual circumstances. If you started your course in October 2020 or earlier, you’ll continue to pay Home (UK) fees for the duration of your course. Read more advice for EU students on our Brexit information webpage

Scholarship search

Careers and alumni

M ARCH: Architecture prepares graduates for employment in architectural practice, urban design, planning, development, and public consultation. In addition, the course provides a solid grounding for continued academic development toward research and PhD study.

Drawing upon extensive industry links within the Spatial Practices Programme, the Course seeks to offer students a unique learning opportunity to engage with live projects and real clients, developing innovative approaches to public engagement and a radical reconsideration of architectural practice.

"In 10 years we probably will not call ourselves an architecture practice, it will be something else entirely" (Architect, Small London-based practice) 
From "The Future for Architects", Building Futures, RIBA, 2010.

Change is inevitable and  being prepared for change is a challenge. M ARCH: Architecture encourages students to take a radical approach to architectural practice; seeking ways in which the architect of the future can work across the industry and beyond.  The course is predicated on the reality that the practice of architecture is changing. There are increasing pressures on the profession from shifts in the way that projects are developed, as well as the changes to the global economy. How will we practice in the future?

"The invasion of the architect's role shouldn't be seen as a threat but as a natural change that can be exploited - we must find our new opportunities and education should shift to accommodate that." (Architect, Large global practice) From "The Future for Architects", Building Futures, RIBA, 2010.