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We can’t wait to welcome our new and returning students from 19 October 2020. Your safety is our first priority.

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MA Costume Design for Performance

College
LCF
Start date
September 2021
Course length
15 months

This costume design course develops confident and experimental practitioners who push the boundaries of costume, both for live performance and film.

Why choose this course at London College of Fashion

  • Where graduates have gone on to work: graduates find employment as assistant designers and costume supervisors in the theatre and film industry. Employers have included: the Royal Opera House, major film productions such as Harry Potter, and fashion labels such as Dior and Chanel.
  • Industry links: the course has great industry links, giving students the opportunity to showcase work to the public on a professional platform. Previously students have worked with Sadler’s Well and the V&A.
  • Facilities: students have access to highly specialist workshop facilities and the expertise of supporting technicians.

Location

This course is based at Lime Grove in Shepherd’s Bush. Find out about the local area, including Holland Park and Notting Hill in our local area guides on the Student Life pages.

London College of Fashion is planning to move to a new single campus on the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park in 2023. This is part of a new development for London, prioritising culture, education and innovation, known as East Bank. Some students studying this course from September 2021 may start their studies in Lime Grove and transfer to LCF’s new site in East London to complete them. Please see LCF’s move to the Olympic Park for more information about the College’s relocation.

Student and graduate work

Aesthetica Film Trailer 2018
LCFMA19 Costume for Performance show - Part 1
LCFMA19 Costume for Performance show Part 2
University of the Arts London and House of Illustration present MarKings festival

Can you perform an illustration? How can art and the human body interact?

Portfolio gallery

Latest news from this course

  • https://www.arts.ac.uk/colleges/london-college-of-fashion/stories/lcfclassof2020-discovery

    #LCFClassOf2020: DISCOVERY

    #LCFClassOf2020 is a dedicated showcase of LCF graduate work across channels. This week we are looking at DISCOVERY. What does this mean to you? What have you discovered during this time?

  • #LCFClassOf2020: Livity presents...

    #LCFClassOf2020 is a dedicated showcase of LCF graduate work across channels. As part of the showcase, youth marketing agency, Livity, have prepared Livity presents...

  • #LCFClassOf2020: RENEWAL

    #LCFClassOf2020 is a dedicated showcase of LCF graduate work across channels. This week we are looking at RENEWAL. What does this mean to you?

  • #LCFClassOf2020: CONNECTION

    #LCFClassOf2020 is a dedicated showcase of LCF graduate work across channels. This week we are looking at CONNECTION. What is connection? Will we feel a connection again? What or who are you connecting to?⁠

  • #LCFClassOf2020: BODY

    #LCFClassOf2020 is a dedicated showcase of LCF graduate work across channels. This week we are looking at BODY. What is your body? What does the word 'body' mean to you?⁠

Facilities

Library, John Princes Street
Library, John Princes Street Photography by: Ideal Insight

LCF archives and library

Take a tour of LCF's world renowned fashion library, ideal for research and study.

Photo Studio, Lime Grove

Media facilities at Lime Grove

Take a tour of Lime Grove's media facilities from photographic studios to darkrooms.

Mare Street Canteen

LCF's social spaces

Explore our social spaces, for collaborative study and breaks, across our six sites in London.

Course overview

MA Costume Design for Performance is a course where practice and theory will be taught together in a blend  of academic and practical skills to reflect new ideas, methods of expression, diversity of cultural backgrounds and analogue as well as digital technologies in performance design. The aim of the course is to develop confident and experimental practitioners who will push the boundaries of the discipline. Through conceptual development, specialised design realisation, theoretical and practical-based research methods, you will explore the role of costume within contemporary performance and recorded media. The course encourages thinking and making as intrinsically linked processes and an examination of a diverse range of analytical methods such psychology, anthropology, history and culture, social and political contexts utilising technologies from photography, film, fine art, textile and product design, audio, digital and online platforms, realisation and all aspects of performance to create meaningful narratives for contemporary audiences. You will explore situations and narratives that raise attention to ethical, social and political issues as well as challenge traditional costume practices. MA Costume Design for Performance articulates the value of costume for performance as an important and distinct area of performance research and practice. You will be encouraged to read widely, attend internal and external lectures, events, exhibitions, performances and symposia, engage with UAL research hubs, collaborate across other LCF postgraduate courses and across the University of the Arts. You will engage with other disciplines such as literature, fine art, film, music/sound, dance and science to explore ways to articulate ideas through costume as conveyor of meaning, You will be encouraged to develop independent innovative responses to, and a critique of current costume and performance practices.

Course units

The course is delivered over 15 months in 3 teaching blocks each lasting 15 weeks. The course is composed of the following units:

  • Narrative Costume and Performance (40 credits)
  • Collaborative Challenge (20 credits)
  • Costume for Film (40 credits)
  • Research Proposal (20 credits)
  • Masters Project (60 credits)

Each unit will be completed over a period of 15 weeks (full time) 

Full schemes of work are published in your Unit Handbooks available via Moodle.

The course is offered in full-time mode and students are expected to commit to an average of 40 hrs per week including teaching hours, delivered briefings, tutorials, lectures, design,workshops and other independent study time. Each unit is supported by a range of individual and group tutorials. (see teaching hours allocation). In the Unit Handbook for each unit, specific teaching methods are summarised in the scheme of works, detailing the teaching structure of each unit. 

Credit Framework

The credit framework conforms to the University of the Arts London framework in which the unit of credit is 20 credits (equivalent to 200 hours of student study time). All credits on the MA programme are at postgraduate level 7.

Organisation of the Curriculum

The first block provides the opportunity to accumulate 60 credits with the units: Narrative Costume and Performance (40 credits) and: Collaborative Challenge (20 credits) and students who successfully complete this block are eligible for the award of a PG Cert. The second block is a further 60 credits with the units: Costume for Film (40 credits) and Research Proposal (20 credits) and students who complete blocks 1 and 2 are eligible for the award of PGDip. The third and final block is the Master’s Project, this is a 60-credit unit and students who successfully complete this block are eligible for the award of a Masters. The final award grading is based upon the Master’s Project only.

Learning and teaching methods

The course offers teaching and learning methods that enable each student to develop in areas they are less familiar with and reach a level of professional inquiry, advance their analytical independence, which are vital for their ability to further their career with a distinctive individual approach with which to challenge existing traditions. The course demands a high level of both intellectual and practical engagement. Networking, collaboration and participation in national and international performance and film festivals, exhibitions, competitions and conferences are firmly supported and promoted by the course and programme and help students to disseminate their work in the public domain.

Methods employed for the delivery of the curriculum: 

The teaching and learning is conducted through a variety of lectures, group discussions, regular individual tutorials, presentations, experimental workshops, independent practice,  master classes, external collaborations and detailed feedback from peers and tutors. The course team also seeks to include digital platforms (Moodle) more actively in the delivery of the curriculum.

Research and Analysis:

Students are familiarised with intensive high level theoretical and practical research methods that allows them to situate their own work in the wider field of art and performance design. They are provided with the foundations of postgraduate level systematic academic research that enables them to make informed analytical decisions grounded in expert knowledge. This is accompanied by prototyping, material, movement, technical and creative experimentation to develop both theory and practice together. Students are required to formulate research questions, develop meaningful messages and identify audiences, employ continuous reflection and evaluations of ideas and realisation processes throughout each project from start to completion which are discussed with tutors and peers on a regular basis. 

Students often seek to utilise their existing cultural diversity and skill base to draw attention to social, political and environmental issues. Frequent discussions with tutors and peers offered through the shared MA Costume studio resources, the cross school collaborative unit, the performance research hub and the PhD Performance Dress Lab provide a platform for knowledge exchange. Students are challenged to develop conceptual approaches that questions traditional perceptions and methods to advances the discipline into new areas of investigation. Experimentations and research outcomes are encouraged to be shared on University and public platforms. 

Theory and Practice:

In line with the UAL Learning, Teaching and Enhancement Strategy (2015-2022) the course pursues ‘enquiry-based and object-based learning’. The course provides a close synergy between theory and practice and at the heart of both is high level research that leads, informs and promotes innovation and engagement with the wider context of art, design and performance as a means of effectively communicating to the public. Students learn to understand the fundamental principles by which a costume can convey meaning and message to audiences. This is achieved by detailed text , character and contextual analysis which often requires investigations and understanding of psychological, religious, social, historical, anthropological, political, philosophical, scientific and feminist theory as well as investigations and understanding of materials, anatomy, physics, digital and manual craft techniques which are utilised, engaged and evaluated in their ability to communicate what is intended. Theoretical concepts and ideas are tested under the guidance and in collaboration with specialist researchers and practitioners from the theatre, dance, fine art, photography and film industry.

Experimentation and Innovation:

The course offers an environment which fosters peer to peer learning. Students can test out ideas and prototypes with each other as audience and performers which encourages reflection and discussion. Practice is both independent and supervised allowing for support where needed. The Performance Programme resources and technical support enable experimentation with analogue and offers guidance and expertise. Students can access media facilities where advanced digital construction and interactive technologies for performance are tested and made available. The knowledge by staff and emphasis on students to experiment with materials, shape and form encourages innovation. As a result, students have won recent awards in the categories of innovation and avantgarde design at WoW in New Zealand and participation in Exhibitions such as Evolution of Performance Design (Beijing, Shanghai 2016), Innovative Costume for the 21st Century: The New Generation, (Moscow 2019).

Technical Skills and Prototyping:

In order to enable students to advance their practice, the course offers a series of technical workshops that are embedded in the delivery of the course. Traditional methods such as corsetry, tailoring, padding, millinery, lingerie and material surface manipulation are delivered by technicians and industry specialists. Alongside those, other skills such as film editing, studio lighting, camera operation and life drawing are offered by academic staff and media technicians. Students also have access to performance and textile design technicians who are specialists in areas such as, knitting, embroidery, print, sculpting, casting, puppetry, masks, animatronics, make-up and hair which provides inspiration and support for experimental prototyping. LCF digital learning will provide workshops on using Workflow. The LCF digital learning lab will provide inductions to 3 D printing, body scanning, conductive materials and sensors. LCF digital learning will provide workshops for professional use of online platforms such as professional marketing tool.

Collaboration:

Collaboration is firmly embedded in the course curriculum. Especially the 3 core units: Costume for Live Performance, Costume for Film and Master’s Project as well as the Collaborative unit, all have substantial collaborative components, enabling the students to develop additional skills in directing, producing, management and postproduction. The Costume for Live Performance and Costume for Film unit offer the opportunity  to work with collaborators in a professional situation where their costume   narrative is developed, tested, performed and recorded. For the Master’s Project, students work with collaborators towards a public facing showcase.

Process Records:

The documentation of research, analysis, concept, design, realisation development processes and methods in form of portfolios, technical logs/costume bible and realised costumes form the key components of the unit delivery by students. These are delivered in analogue and digital form to enable students to develop digital presentation  skills for future use. Guidance and support is provided by staff with an outward facing ethos, encouraging students to record their practice with relevant methods to meet advanced professional standards.

Summary of Teaching and Learning Methods:

  • briefings 
  • lectures 
  • seminars 
  • individual tutorials  
  • master classes  
  • material and technical workshops  
  • presentations 
  • Practical testing
  • collaborative and independent practice  
  • formative feedback 
  • critically reflecting on processes of communicating interpretations and narratives of the realised costumes.

Assessment methods

Formative assessment feedback is provided during: 

  • Presentations to staff and peers
  • Tutorials
  • Reviews of work in progress
  • Final reviews
  • Workshops

Summative Assessment is provided for Unit submission based on the hand in details for each unit specified in the unit descriptors which can include:

  • Portfolios and sketchbooks including a range of final costume designs
  • Technical log books
  • Final realised costume(s) in action
  • Written project evaluation
  • Essays
  • Records of evidence for live performance and film

Staff

Agnes Treplin originally trained in Fashion Design in Berlin before undertaking the BA(Hons) Theatre Design at Central Saint Martin’s and some years after that the MA Performance and Culture at Goldsmith University. Since 1995 she has worked as a theatre designer on many productions for opera, dance, theatre, musicals, film and TV in the UK and internationally. Her most recent design credits: Who Do We Think We Are? (Southwark Playhouse) A Dashing Fellow (New Diorama Theatre London) Werther. Die Sprache der Liebe (Hans Otto Theater, Potsdam, Germany), Warsaw Melody (Arcola Theatre), Am Horizont (Hans Otto Theater, Germany) Consultants and Man in the Middle (Theatre 503, London) The Last 5 Years (Barbican) Land of The Gypsies (Grand Theatre, Casino du Liban, Lebanon) The Marriage of Figaro and Don Pasquale (ETO)The Rise of the Phoenix and Gibran The Prophet and Don Quixote for the  Byblos International Festival in Lebanon, Al Mutanabbi (Baalbek Festival, Lebanon, Xenobia (Dubai)) Der Freischuetz (National Theatre of Iceland), Othello (Basingstoke Theatre). She has designed over 40 productions for Guildhall School of Music, LAMDA and RADA and was appointed head of Design at Drama Centre London from 2000 - 2010. Agnes is currently leading the curation for the UK participation at the exhibition Innovative Costumes of the 21st Century: The New Generation opening in Moscow in 2019.  She engages in research projects addressing costume in performance and most recently produced and designed a costume performance and subsequent film in collaboration with the National Gallery, London College of Fashion, exhibited at the NG, Shoreditch Town Hall and as part of the Evolutions in Performance Design exhibition in Beijing in 2014 and at Shanghai Museum of Modern Art in 2015. She has taught Theatre Design at Central Saint Martin’s College for over 10 years and has been course director for the MA Costume Design for Performance at London College of Fashion since 2010. In addition she took on the role as Programme Director for Performance at LCF from 2105 -2016, holds the PG Cert for Teaching Art and Design and provides PhD supervision at LCF. She is contributing to international research forums most recently at the World Stage Design Expo 2017 in Taiwan for the conference ‘Thinking Costume’. View Agnes Treplin's full profile here.

Claire Christie is the senior lecturer for BA Costume for Performance. She trained at the University of the Creative Arts at Epsom in fashion design. Following graduation, she began her career in costume for theatre, film and television, working over the years on many notable period and contemporary productions. She has made costumes for Judi Dench, Helena Bonham-Carter, Angelina Jolie, Maggie Smith, Dawn French and many others. Film credits include James Bond 007 films Goldeneye (1995) and Tomorrow Never Dies (1997), Shakespeare in Love (1998), Elizabeth (1998), Topsy Turvy (1999), Tomb Raider (2003), and Vera Drake (2004). Her most recent film work includes Harry Potter (2005), A Mighty Heart (2007) working with Angelina Jolie, and Easy Virtue (2008) working with Jessica Beale. Opera and theatre commissions include productions for English National Opera, the Royal Opera House, Garsington Opera and the Chichester Festival, working with designers including Alison Chitty, Nicky Gillibrand, Maria Bjornson, and William Dudley. Claire’s teaching career has included associate lectureships at Central Saint Martins and the Guildhall School of Music and Drama, and programme leader on the Costume Design and Interpretation course at Central School of Speech and Drama. She combines her teaching on this course with being a tutor on the MA Costume Design for Performance in the School of Media and Communication Graduate School at LCF.

Karl J. Rouse trained as a performer at The Royal Academy of Dramatic Art, and later moved into Performance Studies as a Fulbright scholar (representing the UK government under Tony Blair) at The Tisch School of The Arts, New York University.  Here he studied directing under Richard Schechner and Anna Deavere Smith and performed in the ‘downtown’ experimental scene in venues such as PS122, La Mama, and St Annes Wearhouse.  Karl has represented the Performing Arts for the Fulbright Commission at The White House, Downing Street and in the House of Lords.  He was awarded a Royal Holloway, University of London, Scholarship in 2003 and studied customer service and organisational loyalty with The Disney Institute in 2006.  As a producer, Karl has served as Executive Director of The Accidental Festival (The Roundhouse, The ICA, Battersea Arts Centre) which has included the work of Liz LeCompte, Simon McBurney, Richard Foreman, Katy Mitchel, Felix Barret and Tristan Sharps.  Karl is a fellow of The Royal Society of The Arts, and The Centre for Excellence in Training for Theatre, where he focused upon the role of The Entrepreneurial Artist.  This led to presentations at The Fulbright Conference in Beijing, the European League of Arts Institutes (ELIA) in Amsterdam, and The International Entrepreneurial Educators Conference (IEEC) in Sheffield.  Karl was also the first Director of Performance at Capital City Academy, and an Assistant Principal within the Studio School Trust.  He has therefore developed new curricula in new buildings for students aged 12 to 18, and 18 and above.  For ten years he was a senior lecturer and pathway leader at The Royal Central School of Speech and Drama, University of London and has previously served as External Examiner at The National Centre for Circus Arts.  Recently he has become a mentor for The Leadership Foundation, specifically working with BAME Academics seeking to move into senior leadership positions.  He is a mental health first-aider and has an interest in Mindfulness in Education.

How to apply

Opportunities for all

We are committed to making university education an achievable option for a wider range of people and to supporting all of our students in achieving their potential both during and after their courses.

We welcome applications from people with disabilities. If you have a disability (e.g. mobility difficulties, sensory impairments, medical or mental health conditions or Asperger’s syndrome) we strongly encourage you to contact us on disability@arts.ac.uk or +44 (0)20 7514 6156 so that we can plan the right support for you. All enquiries are treated confidentially. To find out more, visit our Disability & Dyslexia webpages.

Entry requirements

The standard entry requirements for this course are as follows:

  • An Honours degree at 2.1 or above in a related discipline. Applicants with a degree in another subject may be considered, depending on the strength of the application;
  • OR Equivalent qualifications;

APEL (Accreditation of Prior (Experiential) Learning)

Applicants who do not meet these course entry requirements may still be considered in exceptional cases. The course team will consider each application that demonstrates additional strengths and alternative evidence. This might, for example, be demonstrated by:

  • Related academic or work experience (for a minimum of three years)
  • The quality of the personal statement
  • A strong academic or other professional reference
  • OR a combination of these factors

Each application will be considered on its own merit but we cannot guarantee an offer in each case.

English Language Requirements

IELTS level 6.5 with a minimum of 5.5 in reading, writing, listening and speaking. Please check our main English Language Requirements

Selection criteria

The course seeks to recruit students from diverse socio-economic and cultural backgrounds, and welcomes applications from mature students.

The course seeks to recruit students who can demonstrate:

  • The potential to develop their practical and critical abilities through academic study;
  • Critical knowledge of a subject area;
  • A capacity for intellectual enquiry and reflective thought;
  • An openness to new ideas and a willingness to participate actively in their own intellectual development;
  • Initiative and a developed and mature attitude to independent study.

Extra information required for applications to this course

When you are submitting your application form, you will also need to provide the following pieces of documentation in support of your application:

Curriculum vitae

You will be required to submit a Curriculum Vitae (C.V.) in support of your application. This should include your full education and employment history.

Personal statement

The personal statement is your opportunity to tell us about yourself and your suitability for the course that you intend to study.

Some key points to consider:

  • Make sure that personal statement is your own work and is about you.
  • Explain why you want to study the course you are applying to.
  • Try to link your skills and experience required to the course.
  • Demonstrate your interest and enthusiasm for the course and link these with your personality.
  • Make sure it is organised and literate (grammar, spelling, punctuation check).

Study proposal

Your study proposal should be no more than 400 words (excluding research sources and bibliography). It should:

  • describe the performance context of the proposal, demonstrating your knowledge of the historical and contemporary context of your area of study;
  • suggest the area of study in your project proposal, e.g. a particular text(s)/ subject area(s) you might be interested in exploring/devising around;
  • consider that the study proposal does change in consultation with tutors; however we need to ensure that you are thinking on the right level for MA study.

Portfolio

You will be required to submit a digital portfolio with a maximum of 30 images that you consider would help support your application. Submit your portfolio via the university’s digital portfolio tool, PebblePad. More details will be sent to you after you have submitted your application. Please include digital versions of drawings, photographs of realised designs, speculative design, sketch work, process, photographs, etc. Label and present any visual work with care, including dates and captions.

Making your application

This course has places available for UK and EU applicants only for 2020/21 entry. Applications for 2021/22 entry will open in Autumn 2020.

This section includes all the information you need on how to apply and how your application is considered, and what happens next.

UK/EU students can apply to a postgraduate course at LCF by completing a direct application.

Application deadline

There are no official deadlines to submit your application. Applications are accepted, and offers are made throughout the year. The course will be closed once spaces are filled so we advise that you apply early.

Deferring your place

This course allows offer holders to defer. If you have an offer of a place, but you would like to defer starting for a year, please contact our Admissions Service as soon as possible via your UAL Portal. Make sure you check our Admissions Policy before requesting a deferral.

If you are an EU offer holder, it is important to consider that, from 2021-22, you may be charged International fees, which are higher. Read our Coronavirus guidance for prospective students for details.

External Student Transfer Policy

If you are currently studying at another institution and if you have successfully completed 60 credits in the equivalent units/modules on your current PG course and wish to continue your studies at London College of Fashion, you can apply to transfer. The Admissions Tutor will consider applications on a case by case basis, subject to places being available. You must apply directly to the course via the course webpage as early as possible. Further information can be found in our UAL External Student Transfer Policy.

What happens next

All application forms, personal statements and relevant documents are read and considered by the course team against the selection criteria listed in the Entry requirements and Selection Criteria sections.

Depending on the quality of your application, you may be asked to submit a number of images of your work. For this course your portfolio could include: drawings; photographs of realised designs; speculative design; sketch work; process; and photographs. Label and present any visual work with care, including dates and captions.

If the course team wish to consider your application further, you will be invited to attend an interview. Interviews may be conducted in person, via telephone or via Skype.

If you are successful at the interview stage you will be offered a place. Please note that applicants are not guaranteed an interview.

Please note that if you are unable to attend, the College may not be able to re-schedule.

How we notify you of the outcome of your application

The result of your application will be communicated to you through your UAL Portal. If your application has been successful, you will receive a full offer pack including details of accommodation, fees, and other important information.

We are no longer accepting applications from international students for 2020/21 entry to this course. Due to the Coronavirus outbreak, we are unable to say at this point if places will become available before the autumn intake. Please check this page regularly as places may become available later in the cycle and if they do, we will reopen applications.

Applications for 2021/22 entry will open in Autumn 2020.

This section includes all the information you need on how to apply and how your application is considered, and what happens next.

International students can apply to a postgraduate course at LCF:

For further advice on how to apply please visit the UAL International Application page.

Application deadline

There are no official deadlines to submit your application. Applications are accepted, and offers are made throughout the year. The course will be closed once spaces are filled so we advise that you apply early.

Deferring your place

This course allows offer holders to defer. If you have an offer of a place, but you would like to defer starting for a year, please contact our Admissions Service as soon as possible via your UAL Portal. Make sure you check our Admissions Policy before requesting a deferral.

External Student Transfer Policy

If you are currently studying at another institution and if you have successfully completed 60 credits in the equivalent units/modules on your current PG course and wish to continue your studies at London College of Fashion, you can apply to transfer. The Admissions Tutor will consider applications on a case by case basis, subject to places being available. You must apply directly to the course via the course webpage as early as possible. Further information can be found in our UAL External Student Transfer Policy.

What happens next

Immigration History Check

After you have applied, you will need to complete an Immigration History Check to identify whether you are eligible to study at UAL. Do be aware, if you do not complete the Immigration History Check we will not be able to proceed with your application.

Initial application check

All application forms, personal statements and relevant documents are read and considered by the course team against the selection criteria listed in the Entry requirements and Selection Criteria sections.

Depending on the quality of your application, you may be asked to submit a number of images of your work. For this course your portfolio could include: drawings; photographs of realised designs; speculative design; sketch work; process; and photographs. Label and present any visual work with care, including dates and captions.

If the course team wish to consider your application further, you will be invited to attend an interview. Interviews may be conducted in person, via telephone or via Skype.

If you are successful at the interview stage you will be offered a place. Please note that applicants are not guaranteed an interview.

Please note that if you are unable to attend, the College may not be able to re-schedule.

How we notify you of the outcome of your application

The result of your application will be communicated to you through your UAL Portal. If your application has been successful, you will receive a full offer pack including details of accommodation, fees, and other important information.


After you apply

After you’ve submitted your application, you’ll receive a confirmation email providing you with your login details for the UAL Portal. We’ll use this Portal to contact you to request any additional information, including inviting you to upload documents or book an interview, so please check it regularly.

Once we’ve reviewed and assessed your application, we’ll contact you via the UAL Portal to let you know whether your application has been successful.

Fees and funding

Home / EU fee

£11,220

This applies for the 2020/21 academic year.

Course fees may be paid in instalments.

International fee

£22,920

This applies for the 2020/21 academic year.

Course fees may be paid in instalments.

Additional costs

In addition to tuition fees you are very likely to incur additional costs such as travel expenses and the cost of materials. Please read the information on our additional costs page.

Charges may be made for special clothing or equipment which students may need in order to participate in certain activities which form part of the course but which they retain. However, where such clothing or equipment is necessary for the student’s health or safety a charge may only be made for clothing and equipment which the student retains if the student also has the option of borrowing the clothing or equipment free of charge.

Accommodation

Find out about the accommodation options available and how much they will cost.

Progression discount

UAL alumni can receive a 20% tuition fee discount on a taught Masters course at UAL. Visit the progression discount page to find out more.

Scholarships and awards

There are a number of scholarships and awards available to students on this course. Use our search tool to find out more information.

Loans

Postgraduate loans of up to £10,000 are now available for eligible UK and EU students. A full list of eligibility criteria and information on applying can be found on the postgraduate loans webpage.

Scholarship search

Careers and alumni

All our postgraduate courses offer career development, so that you become a creative thinker, making effective contributions to your relevant sector of the fashion industry.

LCF offers students the opportunity to develop Personal and Professional Development (PPD) skills while studying through:

* Access to to speaker programmes and events featuring alumni and industry.

* Access to careers activities, such as CV clinics and one-to-one advice sessions.

* Access to a graduate careers service

* Access to a live jobsboard for all years.

* Advice on setting up your own brand or company.

Career paths

MA Costume Design for Performance graduates practice as designers in both the text-based mainstream but also the devised/arthouse live performance and film sector. They often take the collaborative performance work initiated during the course further and as a result, their work has been seen in major national and international festivals, including Prague Quadrennial and Edinburgh Festival, Critical Costume Helsinki (Finland), Pamplona Festival (Spain) and has been exhibited at the National Gallery London, the V&A Museum, National Centre of Performance Art in Beijing, Museum of Modern Art Shanghai and in many other venues in the UK and abroad.

Graduates find employment as assistant designers and costume supervisors in the theatre and film industry in leading institutions such as the Royal Opera House, English National Opera and on films such as Star Wars, Harry Potter and Suffragette. Others have built careers as experts in specific technical areas of costume, such as, pattern cutting, surface textiles, print and dye or fabricated, sculptural costumes. Some graduates are currently working for major fashion labels such as Chanel, Dior, McQueen and Lawrence Xu producing often unusual one-off costumes and objects for the designer’s catwalk shows.

Graduates have found work with artists, whose work borders on performance, such as Lucy Orta and Tracy Emin.