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Postgraduate

MA Arts and Cultural Enterprise

Students raising their arms in the air to mimic the positioning of models shown on the right

College
Central Saint Martins
Start date
January 2022
Course length
Two years part-time (83 weeks)
Up to five years flexible learning mode

MA Arts and Cultural Enterprise teaches you to generate original ideas for arts and cultural events as well as how to realise them.

This course is open for applications from home and international applicants.

Alongside critical and creative thinking, you will acquire business skills which are highly attractive to potential employers. You will learn how to manage creativity, but also how to bring creativity to management. This course is part of the Culture and Enterprise programme.

Why choose this course at Central Saint Martins

  • Global group perspective: This course has two cohorts – one in London and one in Hong Kong. This allows collaboration across time zones with a diverse group of peers, encouraging students to develop a global perspective on arts and cultural enterprise.
  • Flexible learning: As a blended-learning programme, the course offers both the benefits of face-to-face study and the flexibility of online learning. You also don't need to live in London or give up work or care duties to enrol on the course.
  • Individual learning: Students are encouraged to apply their learning to their own professional contexts and can choose to pursue a practice-based final project or a dissertation.
  • Practicing experts: Tutors on the course are professionally active in the field of arts management. UAL is ranked top 2 in the world for Art and Design (QS World University Rankings 2020), and is a top-five research university in its broader peer group.
  • MA-ACE-Virtual-Reality-Conference-52.jpg
    , MA Arts and Cultural Enterprise Virtual Reality Symposium. Photographer Glenn Michael Harper
  • MA-ACE-Virtual-Reality-Conference-34.jpg
    , MA Arts and Cultural Enterprise Virtual Reality Symposium. Photographer Glenn Michael Harper
  • MA-ACE-Virtual-Reality-Conference-01.jpg
    , MA Arts and Cultural Enterprise Virtual Reality Symposium. Photographer Glenn Michael Harper
  • _MG_3076.jpg
    , Celebration of first cohort of graduates for the course
A lecture by Charlotte Bonham-Carter, Co-Course Leader, MA Arts and Cultural Enterprise (26 mins)

Culture and Enterprise Programme stories

  • Remedies and Translations

    In their final year, students from MA Arts and Cultural Enterprise collaborate on an online intervention. This year the projects ran from “audio remedies” for the global pandemic to exploring the impact of live-streaming improvised performance.

  • Class of 2020: Work

    We take a look at the 2020 graduating students exploring the meanings of work.

  • Class of 2020: Damilola Ayo-Vaughan

    Graduating from BA Culture, Criticism and Curation, Damilola Ayo-Vaughan talks to us about his photographic practice which synthesises personal and collective memory.

  • London Grads Now at Saatchi Gallery

    Saatchi Gallery invited the College to take part in its celebration of the 2020 class graduating from London’s art schools. We speak to students Mazzy-Mae Green and Greta Voeller who took on the challenge to produce an exhibition in a matter of

Facilities

Course overview

The college is at the centre of a global network of alumni, educator-practitioners, and collaborating organisations and institutions. MA Arts and Cultural Enterprise works with knowledgeable practitioners to create an inspiring learning experience, within a wide-ranging professional network.

The intensive face-to-face teaching takes place at Central Saint Martins’ King’s Cross campus for the students enrolled in the London-based cohort, and at HKU SPACE’s Hong Kong campus for the Hong Kong-based students. Both cities are contemporary hubs for the cultural industries in their regions, and also rich sources of historical innovation across a wide range of cultural sectors, including museums, galleries, performance, festivals, and educational institutions.

MA Arts and Cultural Enterprise acknowledges that we are living in a fast-changing, globalised world, which presents a great number of opportunities and challenges for cultural innovation. This Masters Programme takes these changing conditions as a starting point to engage you in developing new knowledge and skills in order to manage cultural projects in the UK and around the world. It has been developed specifically in response to an increasing need for multi-skilled individuals who can both generate the ideas for original arts and cultural events, as well as provide leadership for the teams that realise them. These individuals will be dynamic, responsive, and fluent in public and private sectors, and have the ability to collaborate and develop networks.

The course addresses a contemporary shift within the cultural economy towards experiences and events, and away from the artefact. It is a response to multiple new forms of artistic and creative practice (interdisciplinary, time-based, socially-engaged, etc.), which demand new, hybrid forms of cultural management and organisation, and in turn, a new pedagogical approach from higher education institutions.

MA Arts and Cultural Enterprise takes as a starting point a definition of enterprise as engaging with projects that are new, challenging and complex, in order to create a valuable difference to specific stakeholders. It aims to enable you to gain a unique skill and knowledge set to become active creators in cultural management and production, be it as entrepreneurs, or within larger existing cultural organisations, anywhere in the world. For this reason, the course values rich cultural diversity, and benefits from the broad range of cultural backgrounds of its students, staff, and the college generally. Cultural diversity and intercultural dialogue are the essential point-of-departure for cultural and creative innovation, which generates cultural capital, and in turn fosters economic capital formation.

The course is aimed at graduates with some years of work experience who wish to challenge themselves by gaining a critical understanding of our world today as well as skills in the design, planning and production of creative events in the broadest sense. Focusing on the core capabilities of CSM, and its central role in the future of arts and other creative industries, it will offer you insights into aspects of cultural policy and governance, an introduction to business skills and processes, and strategic planning, which will equip you to shape creative futures. It will encourage radical thinking, based on creative research, analysis, and a deep understanding of the value of the cultural economy, and its role in creating cultural capital, to the wider economic, political and social environment in which it is located.

The course operates through a blended-learning delivery model, by means of face-to-face and online teaching, in either a two-year part-time, or up to five-year flexible mode. This mode of learning supports those of you who are already established in your careers, and who may be travelling from afar to join the course. Peer and collaborative learning is fundamental to this model, and is achieved through a series of lectures, webinars, group tasks and workshops, as well as practice-based project developments in the realm of cultural production, enabling you to create networks that we hope will last well beyond your studies.

The course comprises six multidisciplinary, 20-credit, Level 7 units that can be combined to achieve a PG Cert or PG Dip, followed by a 60-credit unit (dissertation/major project), to achieve an MA. Each of the six 20-credit units sets out to equip you with specific skills, knowledge and insights relevant to cultural innovation; as such, the content, teaching and learning activities, and assessment evidence for each one, is distinctive and uses the lexicon and discourses relevant to the specific range of disciplines that it covers. The final 60-credit unit offers the opportunity to bring together and demonstrate your assimilation of the skills and knowledge gained.

The course starts with Unit 1: Researching Arts and Cultural Enterprise, in which you are introduced to key concepts of cultural production as well as the research, writing, analysis and evaluation skills essential for postgraduate study. You begin to work together as a group, learning to negotiate, agree ground rules, communicate and share ideas and, importantly, learn how to approach and resolve difficulty and conflict.

Unit 2: Practice, Policy and Markets engages you in the macro analysis of the realm of cultural and artistic production and dissemination. It enables you to develop an understanding of cultural production in both the commercial and the public realms.

Unit 3: Contexts – Local and Global Challenges looks at the impact of contemporary values and discourses on the future. It interrogates globalisation as a challenge as well as an opportunity, and facilitates an understanding of enterprise in uncertain contexts.

In Unit 4: Arts Entrepreneurship, you explore the ways in which creativity, innovation, problem solving and entrepreneurship intersect. It employs real-world examples to enable you to think about business model innovation, new markets, new experiences and services, new ways of communication and new organisational models.

Unit 5: Business Models and Planning is the core business unit of the course. It introduces you to the basics of general business processes and developing strategies around short and longer-term challenges. Teaching includes theoretical approaches, and case-study-based learning.

Unit 6: Focus: Social Impact and Innovation engages with the overarching principles of social responsibility, ethical behaviours, social innovation and theories of socially-engaged practices, and challenges you to form an understanding of how cultural events and activities can support engagement with innovation and innovative practices.

Unit 7: Dissertation or live project is the final, Masters-specific 60-credit unit, which enables you to reflect critically on theories and critical skills encountered previously in the course, while proposing new approaches to cultural production, in a self-directed dissertation or major project. The dissertation is an individual academic study, based on models and theories discussed throughout the course; the live project puts strategies of cultural production into practice. This unit culminates in you working together to organise an online intervention.

Contact us

For queries relating to the Coronavirus outbreak, read our Coronavirus guidance for prospective students.

To register your interest and receive information and updates about studying at UAL, please complete this form.

If you can’t find the information you’re looking for or to ask a question, please contact us.

Course dates

Course begins January 2021

Please note that teaching will regularly take place over long weekends, in evenings and outside of UAL term dates, including during standard student Easter and summer breaks.

Course units

The course is offered in both two-year part-time, and flexible learning modes.

Part-time mode over two years: this means that, to achieve the Masters qualification in part-time mode, your learning is timetabled across 83 weeks over two full calendar years. To achieve the PG Cert takes 27 weeks’ study, over around an 8-month period, and for the PG Dip, it takes 54 weeks’ study, over around a 16-month period. Both PG Cert and PG Dip are offered as an exit award only.

Flexible learning mode: in this mode, individual units can be undertaken over a maximum five-year registration period. Unit 1 is compulsory and must be taken as the initial unit. Units 2 to 6 can be taken in any order thereafter. Unit 7 can be undertaken only when units one to six have been passed.

In either mode, the MA award is based solely on the achievement in Unit 7.

You are expected to commit an average of around 22 hours per week to your studies. Taught input is offered through intensive face-to-face teaching and learning activities on site near the beginning of each unit, and continues in the form of synchronous and asynchronous online teaching, support and feedback via Moodle (the University’s Virtual Learning Environment) throughout the remainder of the unit.

The course has been designed in this way to enable you to pursue your studies whilst also undertaking part-time employment, internships or care responsibilities. Your calendar for each unit is available on Moodle, and week-by-week timetable information is updated on a continuing basis.

Learning and teaching methods

Modes of learning

Option 1: 83 weeks over two years 

This means that to achieve the Masters qualification your learning is timetabled across 83 weeks over two full calendar years. To achieve the PG Cert takes 27 weeks’ study, over around an 8-month period, and for the PG Dip, it takes 54 weeks’ study, over around a 16-month period. Both PG Cert and PG Dip are offered as an exit award only. 

Option 2: Up to five years (London cohort only)

In this mode, individual units can be undertaken over a maximum five-year registration period. Unit 1 is compulsory and must be taken as the initial unit. Units 2 to 6 can be taken in any order thereafter. Unit 7 can be undertaken only when units one to six have been passed. 

In either mode, the MA award is based solely on the achievement in Unit 7. 

Units 1 to 6 

Study is facilitated through weekly activity briefs and reading tasks, peer and self- evaluation in online group tutorials and individual online tutorial feedback. Group workshops and seminars during the face-to-face study time support your engagement further. To achieve this, the programme of study will typically include:

  • Unit briefing and introduction; 
  • ‘Ice-Breaker’ activity briefs; 
  • Group on-line ‘orientation’ exercise; 
  • Reading tasks; 
  • Face-to-Face workshops, introducing different ways of locating, interrogating, and interpreting a number of theoretical models; 
  • Team work; 
  • Student presentations to tutors and peers; 
  • Peer and external feedback; 
  • Tutorial facilitation/evaluation related to team/individual and cohort. 

Unit 7 Dissertation or Live Project 

This unit is focused on self-directed learning as students bring together the various components of the course. Students will be assigned a personal tutor, and they will need to negotiate the form and timing of the engagement with their tutor – e.g. face-to-face, digital/virtual interaction or telephone/video conferencing – taking account of the allocated learning and teaching hours for this unit. 

Assessment methods

Each summative unit assessment will be assessed either ‘holistically’ or broken down into ‘elements’: 

  • Holistic Assessment: In holistic assessment students may be asked to submit one or more pieces of work, but tutors will look at all the work for the unit and make a single judgement about students’ performance against the University’s marking criteria. Students will receive a single grade and a single feedback form. Students will need to achieve a grade of D- or above to pass the unit. 
  • Element Assessment: When a unit is made up of a number of different pieces of work (or ‘elements’), those elements may be marked by different tutors or submitted at different times. In this case, each element is ‘weighted’ and added together to create the unit grade and students will receive a grade and feedback form for each individual element. Students will need to achieve at least an E grade in each individual element and at least a D- grade in the unit overall in order to pass the unit. 

Unit 1 – Holistic assessment 

  • Submit a 500-word reflective report at the end of the unit (summatively assessed)
  • Submit a 1,000-word literature review (summatively assessed)
  • Contribute to a group presentation of a proposal for the selection of an online platform (e.g. Facebook, Workflow, Google+) and the creation of content (summatively assessed). 

Unit 2 – Holistic assessment

  • Team-led and individual writing tasks and contributions to seminars throughout the unit, evidenced in students’ online interactions in the digital classroom (formatively assessed) 
  • A 3,000-word academic essay: you will develop an academic argument about practice, policy or markets in the creative industries. Your essay should have a clear research question, and should critically engage with relevant literature. 

Unit 3 – Holistic assessment 

  • Team-led and individual writing tasks and contributions to peer presentations throughout the unit, evidenced in the Reading Room Forum online (formatively assessed)
  • Two analytical case studies of 1,500 words each, providing an example of both a successful and an unsuccessful attempt to engage with local and global challenges. This can be through cultural activities and innovation (at the governmental/societal level), or cultural responses (at the community and individual level) (summatively assessed).

Unit 4 – Holistic assessment 

  • Keep a blog documenting reflections and progress of research throughout the unit (formatively assessed)
  • Submit a 500-word report outlining how the student has contributed to the progress of their fellow students’ projects and acknowledging and reflecting on the contributions of others to their own project (summatively assessed)
  • Prepare the first part of a proposal for an art or cultural venture targeted at a specific audience. The proposal is not expected to cover the details of the project’s finance and implementation. Instead the focus should be on presenting a persuasive, compelling and vivid description of the concept and the need for it (summatively assessed). It should include: 
    1. An artefact using appropriate media (text, brochure, web site, video or other agreed intervention) targeted to its audience and compellingly positioning the experience, product or service to test demand. For example, students could mock a video and text a pitch for a crowdfunding campaign. 
    2. A 1,000-word report making the case for the project’s viability, including: a profile of the target audience, insights into their needs, aspirations and preferences; description of the gap identified and how the offering matches this gap. All of this should be backed up by evidence gathered as a result of field research and iteration throughout the unit. 

Unit 5 – Holistic assessment 

  1. A business presentation to your cohort peer group in two parts:  
    • An outline of your own specific strategy for personal career development, to enable you to use the ideas of this Unit and the course as whole to support your continuing use of the reflective practitioner concept in your personal and professional future (formatively assessed). 
    • A critical review of how you intend to apply the project management and business model ideas of this Unit to the creation of your final assignment for Unit 7, or an alternative 'real-world' scenario which is relevant to your current professional practice (formatively assessed).  
  2. The Unit concludes with the submission of a 2,000-word report (or a similar value artefact such as a video production or digital resource - with prior agreement of the unit tutor), exploring the opportunities and challenges (risks) of creating a sustainable business model for your artistic or cultural future. You are encouraged to build upon the work you have done in the earlier units of the course (summatively assessed).

Unit 6 – Holistic assessment 

  • As a group, present a case study of your own choice to the cohort that represents a real-world example of a cultural endeavour that has sought to inspire social innovation or societal change. 
  • Individually, select and use a model of CSR or social innovation to develop your own cultural project. This can be presented either as a written report, or can take the form of an online intervention such as a blog or a website; in either case, it should comprise 2,000 words. 

Unit 7 – Holistic assessment 

  • Option A – Dissertation: A 12,500-word dissertation in the form of an in-depth, critical analysis of the theoretical principles and discourses of cultural production and innovation. 
  • Option B – Live Project: an individual practical project, with original research and appropriate documentation totalling 12,500 words, which identifies and puts into practice some of the strategies of cultural production and innovation previously encountered on the course. 

Supported by the Course Team, you are also all required to work with your peers on the organisation of an online intervention. The organisation of the intervention is an opportunity to work as a group, and to employ strategies of cultural production encountered on the course. The intervention is also an opportunity to celebrate the critical and creative achievements of the group with a wider audience.

How to apply

Opportunities for all

We are committed to making university education an achievable option for a wider range of people and to supporting all of our students in achieving their potential both during and after their courses.

We welcome applications from people with disabilities. If you have a disability (e.g. mobility difficulties, sensory impairments, medical or mental health conditions or Asperger’s syndrome) we strongly encourage you to contact us on disability@arts.ac.uk or +44 (0)20 7514 6156 so that we can plan the right support for you. All enquiries are treated confidentially. To find out more, visit our Disability & Dyslexia webpages.

Entry requirements

The standard entry requirements for this course are as follows:

  • An honours degree from disciplines such as fine art or design, the humanities, social sciences, politics or economics, or other areas of creative practice such as performance
  • Or an equivalent EU/international qualification

And a minimum of two years of work experience in the arts, design, performance or creative business management and administration sectors. The course will not recruit from end-on students (i.e. those progressing directly from undergraduate degrees).

English language requirements

IELTS level 7.0 or above, with at least 5.5 in reading, writing, listening and speaking (please check our main English language requirements webpage).

Selection criteria

We select applicants according to potential and current ability in the following areas:

  • Have the ability to think in abstract terms about planning, management, and resources
  • Have excellent communication skills
  • Be numerate, and display some experience and understanding of logistics and strategic thinking
  • Be team players and builders, not competitive individualists
  • Demonstrate a collaborative mindset and an ability to negotiate roles within multidisciplinary and cross-cultural teams
  • Have a strong level of standard computer literacy.

Note: It would be an advantage to have working knowledge of some Adobe CS software.

Although applicants will be expected to learn and use some aspects of Web 2.0 such as blogging and use social media, the course is not designed to teach students how to use a computer.

Computer equipment requirements

Applicants will need to be able to access/have:

  • A recent computer with an up-to-date operating system and web browser (smartphones and tablets can also be used, but are subject to some restrictions during the live classes)
  • A reliable, fast broadband connection (slow internet connection can affect the learner experience, especially during a live session in a virtual classroom)
  • A microphone (e.g. integrated to a laptop)
  • A webcam (e.g. integrated to a laptop)
  • Headphones (a headset with microphone/headphones is highly recommended).

What we are looking for

We are looking for applicants who want to plan, fund and realise cultural events and processes, rather than further developing their own individual practice.  It is also aimed at professionals wanting to get a greater understanding of the frameworks governing the cultural sectors as well as foster their business management skills.

As prospective entrepreneurs and creative strategists, applicants will need to demonstrate:

  • They can learn from failure
  • They are inclusive and understand the need to embrace diversity.

Making your application

You should apply by clicking on the link to the direct form below. The application form can be saved as you fill it out, so you do not need to complete it all at once. You will also have the chance to review all the information and make any necessary amendments before you submit the application form.

Deferred entry

This course accepts requests from offer holders to defer their place for one academic year. Deferral requests are granted on a first-come, first-served basis until all deferral places are filled, or a deadline has been reached, whichever is sooner. Read our Admissions Policy for details, including how to request a deferral and by when.

Transfers

If you are currently studying at another institution and if you have successfully completed 60 credits in the equivalent units and modules on your current postgraduate course and wish to continue your studies at Central Saint Martins, you can apply to transfer. The Admissions Tutor will consider applications on a case by case basis, subject to places being available. You must apply directly to the course via the course webpage as early as possible.

Please check our Student Transfer Policy for more important information and be ready to provide us with your current course handbook and unit transcripts.

You will need to provide an official document (translated into English) from your current university, explaining the learning outcomes of the units you have completed.

Start your application now - part-time

Start your application now - flexible part-time

Before you apply, please take time to read the guidance below. You will be asked to provide the following information when completing the online application form:

General information

Personal details (including legal full name, date of birth, nationality, addresses)

Current English language level

Current and/or previous education and qualification details

Employment history

Personal statement

Your personal statement should give us information about yourself and why you want to join the course. Please write no more than 300 words. Your statement should address the following:

  • Why do you wish to study on this course?
  • What are you doing at the moment (professionally or personally)?
  • How do you see MA Arts and Cultural Enterprise impacting upon your career/personal development?
  • Bearing in mind the importance of collaboration and peer-to-peer learning in this course, what skills, experiences or personal attributes would you contribute to the MA group?

Study proposal

This is your opportunity to show us where your interests lie and how you might apply course content. It is not a definitive study plan, and we fully anticipate that your ideas will change over the course of the MA, as you are involved in learning. However, we do expect that you have will have some initial ideas, coming into the course, of what interests you, and how the course will help you to pursue these interests. Please write no more than 800 words. Your study proposal should address ONE of the areas below:

Either Area 1

Describe your research interests and a topic within arts and cultural enterprise that you would like to investigate at postgraduate level:

  • What has drawn you to this topic?
  • Why is it interesting?
  • What do you already know about this topic, and what hypotheses would you like to explore?
  • How might you undertake research on this topic?
  • How will the course assist you in approaching this research?
Or Area 2

Describe your research interests and a new, or different approach to cultural production, which you would like to put into practice:

  • What would you like to do?
  • What existing models of production would you draw upon, and where would you depart from them?
  • Is there a market for your endeavour? What does it look like?
  • Which production stages have you thought through (fundraising, identifying partners, market research, etc.?)
  • How will the course assist you developing your idea?

We cannot consider your application if you do not provide all the information above.

Communicating with you

After you have successfully submitted your application, you will receive an email confirming we have successfully received your application and providing you with your login details for the UAL Portal.  We will request any additional information from you, including inviting you to upload documents / portfolio / book an interview, through the portal.  You should check your UAL Portal regularly for any important updates and requests.

Please add csm.ukeu@arts.ac.uk to your contacts to ensure that you do not miss any important updates re: your application to UAL. Also consider altering your spam or junk mail filter to ensure that emails from @arts.ac.uk get through to you.

After you apply - what happens next

Initial application check

We check your application to see if you meet the standard entry requirements for the course.  Following a review on your written work, you may be invited for interview.

Interview

Applicants who are invited to interview may be interviewed either online or by telephone.

How we notify you of the outcome of your application

You will receive the outcome of your application through the UAL Portal.

Application deadline

19 November 2021

We recommend you apply by the end of October to avoid disappointment. We reserve the right to close applications earlier than the deadline above subject to spaces available.

There are two ways international students can apply:

If you are applying directly you click on the link to the direct form below. The application form can be saved as you fill it out, so you do not need to complete it all at once. You will also have the chance to review all the information and make any necessary amendments before you submit the application form.

Deferred entry

This course accepts requests from offer holders to defer their place for one academic year. Deferral requests are granted on a first-come, first-served basis until all deferral places are filled, or a deadline has been reached, whichever is sooner. Read our Admissions Policy for details, including how to request a deferral and by when.

Transfers

If you are currently studying at another institution and if you have successfully completed 60 credits in the equivalent units and modules on your current postgraduate course and wish to continue your studies at Central Saint Martins, you can apply to transfer. The Admissions Tutor will consider applications on a case by case basis, subject to places being available. You must apply directly to the course via the course webpage as early as possible.

Please check our Student Transfer Policy for more important information and be ready to provide us with your current course handbook and unit transcripts.

You will need to provide an official document (translated into English) from your current university, explaining the learning outcomes of the units you have completed.

Start your application now - part-time

Start your application now - flexible part-time

Before you apply, please take time to read the guidance below. You will be asked to provide the following information when completing the online application form:

General information

Personal details (including legal full name, date of birth, nationality, addresses)

Current English language level

Current and/or previous education and qualification details

Employment history

Personal statement

Your personal statement should give us information about yourself and why you want to join the course. Please write no more than 300 words. Your statement should address the following:

  • Why do you wish to study on this course?
  • What are you doing at the moment (professionally or personally)?
  • How do you see MA Arts and Cultural Enterprise impacting upon your career/personal development?
  • Bearing in mind the importance of collaboration and peer-to-peer learning in this course, what skills, experiences or personal attributes would you contribute to the MA group?

Study proposal

This is your opportunity to show us where your interests lie and how you might apply course content. It is not a definitive study plan, and we fully anticipate that your ideas will change over the course of the MA, as you are involved in learning. However, we do expect that you have will have some initial ideas, coming into the course, of what interests you, and how the course will help you to pursue these interests. Please write no more than 800 words. Your study proposal should address ONE of the areas below:

Either Area 1

Describe your research interests and a topic within arts and cultural enterprise that you would like to investigate at postgraduate level:

  • What has drawn you to this topic?
  • Why is it interesting?
  • What do you already know about this topic, and what hypotheses would you like to explore?
  • How might you undertake research on this topic?
  • How will the course assist you in approaching this research?
Or Area 2

Describe your research interests and a new, or different approach to cultural production, which you would like to put into practice:

  • What would you like to do?
  • What existing models of production would you draw upon, and where would you depart from them?
  • Is there a market for your endeavour? What does it look like?
  • Which production stages have you thought through (fundraising, identifying partners, market research, etc.?)
  • How will the course assist you developing your idea?

Immigration history check

Whether you are applying online or through a UAL representative you will need to complete an immigration history check to establish whether you are eligible to study at UAL.  If you do not complete the check we will not be able to proceed with your application.

We cannot consider your application if you do not provide all the information above.

Communicating with you

After you have successfully submitted your application, you will receive an email confirming we have successfully received your application and providing you with your login details for the UAL Portal.  We will request any additional information from you, including inviting you to upload documents / portfolio / book an interview, through the portal.  You should check your UAL Portal regularly for any important updates and requests.

Please add csm.international@arts.ac.uk to your contacts to ensure that you do not miss any important updates re: your application to UAL.  Also consider altering your spam or junk mail filter to ensure that emails from @arts.ac.uk get through to you.

After you apply - what happens next

Initial application check

We check your application to see if you meet the standard entry requirements for the course.  Following a review on your written work, you may be invited for interview.

Interview

Applicants who are invited to interview may be interviewed either online or by telephone.

How we notify you of the outcome of your application

You will receive the outcome of your application through the UAL Portal.

Application deadline

19 November 2021

We recommend you apply by the end of October to avoid disappointment. We reserve the right to close applications earlier than the deadline above subject to spaces available.

Fees and funding

Home fee

£5,610 per year (Part time); £1,365 per 20 credit unit (Flexible mode)

In the flexible learning option, the 60 credit unit, Dissertation or Live Personal Project (£4,095 for 60 credits), can only be taken after the successful completion of all other units, totalling 120 credits.

This fee is correct for 2021/22 entry and is subject to change for 2022/23 entry. Tuition fees may increase in future years for new and continuing students on courses lasting more than one year. Unit fees will be adjusted to reflect any changes in the annual tuition fee applicable to the year of study. For this course, you can pay tuition fees in instalments.

Home fees are currently charged to UK resident nationals. However, the rules are complex and you can find out more on our tuition fees pages.

From 2021/22 entry, most EU students will be charged the International tuition fee rate, although this may depend on your individual circumstances. If you started your course in October 2020 or earlier, you’ll continue to pay Home (UK) fees for the duration of your course. Read more advice for EU students on our Brexit information webpage

International fee

£11,460 per year (Part time); £2,875 per 20 credit unit (Flexible mode)

In the flexible learning option, the 60 credit unit, Dissertation or Live Personal Project (£8,625 for 60 credits), can only be taken after the successful completion of all other units, totalling 120 credits.

This fee is correct for 2021/22 entry and is subject to change for 2022/23 entry. Tuition fees for international students may increase by up to 5% in each future year of your course.  Unit fees will be adjusted to reflect any changes in the annual tuition fee applicable to the year of study. For this course, you can pay tuition fees in instalments.

International fees are currently charged to students from countries outside of the UK. However, the rules are complex and more information can be found on our tuition fees pages.

From 2021/22 entry, most EU students will be charged the International tuition fee rate, although this may depend on your individual circumstances. If you started your course in October 2020 or earlier, you’ll continue to pay Home (UK) fees for the duration of your course. Read more advice for EU students on our Brexit information webpage

Scholarship search

Careers and alumni

MA Arts and Cultural Enterprise aims to prepare graduates for the next step in their careers, whether that be a management position or a role within a leading team in the field of arts and cultural production. The entrepreneurial spirit of the course might also encourage some graduates to set up their own company or creative practice, or to work as a consultant.

Other areas of employment that this course might lead to include cultural institutions such as museums, theatre companies, cultural and live events companies and orchestras, broadcasters and publishers. Governance, policy and communication positions are also within the remit of the course. Overall, the course prepares graduates for careers where culture, economy and policy come together.

Specific roles a graduate might fulfil include: festival director; event manager; cultural sector entrepreneur; senior manager within an arts institution or organisation; cultural policy adviser within government; arts and community engagement adviser within a corporate enterprise; consultant to creative sector venture capital funds and angel investors (investors from the not-for-profit and philanthropic sectors).

Alumni