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MRes Art: Moving Image

College
CSM
Start date
September 2019
Course length
2 years

Course summary

Over the past two decades, artists' moving image has proved itself a dynamic and thriving area of art practice to be encountered in the gallery, museum, cinema auditorium, and a host of other unexpected venues, but what about the rich and fascinating histories, theories and aesthetics that have led artists to turn to film and video?

And what insights can a study of artists' moving image offer us for understanding the diverse practices that now fill art spaces internationally as well as in the UK?

A unique association between LUX and Central Saint Martins has created a research-led Masters degree to address these questions. The course is focused on nurturing a discursive culture around moving image art which offers a number of unique features for students interested in studying and working in the field of artists' moving image.

This course is part of the Art Programme.

Great reasons to apply

  • MRes Art: Moving Image offers the opportunity of acquiring unique insight and depth into the subject of artists' moving image culture, through lectures, seminars and screenings with acknowledged scholars, artists and specialists in the field. Please see the staff profiles at the bottom of the page for information about our eminent contributors.
  • Central Saint Martins was one of the first educational establishments to recognise the importance of the moving image as an art medium and continues to lead scholarship through its academic activities and related archives, such as the Moving Image Forum and the unique resource of the British Artists Film and Video Study Collection.
  • You’ll benefit from our strong link with LUX, a key UK agency (based in London) for the support and promotion of artists' moving image practice, where you’ll have unique access to the professional working context of LUX as well as its large network of collaborating national and international institutions, artists and key arts professionals working with the moving image.
  • You’ll have excellent access to the UK's only significant collection of artists' film and video works and the largest such collection in Europe, held by LUX, and use of the British Artists Film and Video Study Collection held at CSM.
  • You’ll be well placed to pursue a range of careers in artists' moving image culture. You may opt for academic scholarship through doctoral research or choose to continue in professions within curating and film programming, distribution, publishing and journalism. For some graduates the course will enrich their own practice as artists working with moving image.
  • MRes Art: Moving Image enables you to pursue your studies whilst also undertaking part-time employment, internships or care responsibilities. You are expected to commit 30 hours per week to your studies; your taught input will normally be scheduled over a maximum of two to three days per week during term time.

Open days

The next open days will be scheduled from February to April 2019, please check back here by December 2018 to book online.

Scholarships available

Jane Rapley Scholarships

Postgraduate loans of up to £10,000 are now available for eligible UK and EU students. See the postgraduate loan page for a full list of eligibility criteria and information on applying.

Facilities

Photo of book shelves at the CSM library

Library

Find out more about the Central Saint Martins Library.

Photo of seats facing a stage in a lecture hall

LVMH Lecture Theatre

Find out more about the LVMH Lecture Theatre.

Photo of a group of people in the distance looking at art on a white wall

Lethaby Gallery

Find out more about the Lethaby Gallery.

Course details

MRes Art allows you to address a specialist area of fine art research and to explore the relationships between your chosen specialism and the broader fine art community in the context of our Fine Art Programme.

Synergies in our Fine Art Programme - incorporating MA Fine Art, MA Art and Science, MA Photography, MRes Art: Exhibition Studies, MRes Art: Moving Image, and MRes Art: Theory and Philosophy - create a dynamic context for exploring practices and issues within contemporary culture.

In its extended full-time mode MRes Art gives you the flexibility to access London's richly varied opportunities for work and study while maximising your personal and professional development.

MRes Art prepares you to work particularly in the academic and research contexts of professional environments, to undertake PhD study, or pursue independent research. The course benefits from links with relevant professional and academic organisations in London and internationally and from the varied expertise of its research staff.

The three pathways provide a focus for your study while also enabling you to explore shared ground and questions of disciplinary territories and boundaries.

MRes Art: Moving Image is the first course of its kind. Founded on a strong link with LUX, a key UK agency (based in London) for the support and promotion of artists' moving image practice, the pathway provides an opportunity to focus on theoretical and historical study of artists' moving image. Despite artists' moving image being one of the most visible and fastest growing contexts for visual arts practice, there is no existing centre of scholarship in this area and, at this time, practice runs far ahead of discourse. While huge amounts of work are being made and shown, the specific language to describe and respond to it critically remains underdeveloped.

MRes Art: Moving Image develops in-depth knowledge and exploration of artists' moving image as an evolving and discursive field of study. The postgraduate course presents an integrated series of screenings, seminars and set readings of key works, which together address a range of theoretical positions and historical contexts.

MRes Art: Moving Image supports and is shaped by:

  • Development of scholarship and research in the subject
  • Student access to the professional working context of LUX as well as its large network of collaborating national and international institutions, artists and key arts professionals working with the moving image
  • Student access to the UK's only significant collection of artists' film and video works and the largest such collection in Europe, held by LUX, and use of the British Artists Film and Video Study Collection held at CSM
  • Student projects that draw on LUX's experience of delivering public programming (exhibitions, screenings, commissions).

Course outline

While laying the foundations for an in-depth knowledge of the subject, MRes Art: Moving Image promotes understanding of artists' moving image as an evolving and discursive field of study that touches on many areas of scholarship, from visual arts to experimental music. Rather than following established historical trajectories, MRes Art: Moving Image presents an integrated series of screenings, seminars and set textual readings of key works addressing a range of theoretical positions and historical contexts. Gallery visits and lectures augment the seminar programme.

MRes Art: Moving Image gives you the chance to engage with the academic and professional expertise of CSM and LUX, leading to an in-depth understanding of the current questions and contexts surrounding artists' moving image. The MRes course proposes new approaches to the history and theory of moving image culture, and promotes a professional emphasis through its unique association with LUX. It helps you create vital links to moving image organisations outside the academy, enabling you to develop the professional and academic skills needed for your chosen field of moving image scholarship.

MRes Art: Moving Image aims to lead UK scholarship in the international arena of artists' moving image through its academic activities (conferences, symposia and publications), facilitating research by its staff and serving as a platform for you to develop your interest and research towards potential MPhil and PhD study. A strong curatorial component locates you in the professional field of artists' moving image culture via lectures from visiting curators and artists, gallery talks and visits, and potential individual placements with museums, galleries and other relevant organisations in London and beyond.

MRes Art: Moving Image creates a firm foundation of knowledge from which you can frame and develop your chosen area of study and contribute to debate. The first year offers teaching in research skills while engaging you in the specialist subject of your pathway. At the same time you'll prepare for a personally directed programme of study - your research project. In the second year you'll pursue and realise your project. Your progress is supported through tutorials and critical discussions, and monitored through written assignments and presentations. Your realised project is the principal assessed work leading to the MRes qualification.

Course units

Unit One - Framing Artists' Moving Image

Unit One runs concurrently with Unit Two and introduces you to the key theoretical, contextual and critical frameworks needed for an in-depth understanding of artists' moving image.

The unit offers seminar and lecture programmes to build knowledge of the key thinkers and debates that have emerged throughout the history of artists' moving image, from early explorations of cinematic perception such as Walter Benjamin's notion of the 'optical unconscious' to the influence of Marxist thought on the idea of a counter-cinema. At the same time these theories and theorists are located within the contemporary perspective of moving image practice - via, for example, the impact of counter-cinema on the current 'documentary turn' in contemporary artists' film.

The seminar programmes are supported by a series of film screenings hosted by LUX, which provide opportunities to debate and challenge questions raised. Gallery visits and lectures from visiting experts support the seminars and screenings.

Unit Two - Thinking as Practice (Research Methodologies One)

This unit, common to all courses within our Postgraduate Art Programme, helps you engage with the postgraduate and research community at CSM.

Unit Two introduces the fundamental research skills that enable you to make informed decisions about appropriate methods to use in your chosen area of study and your professional future. The unit examines specific research skills and different kinds of research. Skills and knowledge areas covered include interviewing, literature search and review, archival skills, software for use in research and e-resources, feasibility studies, data analysis, referencing, citation and bibliographic conventions, and ethics. Seminars and workshops emphasise participation and the building of core research skills through practical exercises and small group projects.

Lectures ask how arts research and discourse is developed, shared and understood. The focus is on methods of learning, thinking, evaluation and interpretation as both practice based and theoretical forms of enquiry. The diversity of research activity at CSM provides a broad range of models and examples, with particular attention given to the place of practice in research projects.

Unit Two is assessed by workshop assignments.

Unit Three - Critical Practices (Research Methodologies Two)

Building on the introduction to research provided by Unit Two, Unit Three - which is common to all three MRes Art pathways - increases your focus on in-depth understanding of research methods and how they're applied within the arts and humanities.

The unit aims to demonstrate the dynamic ways in which conceptual and theoretical frameworks can be developed through the application of research methodologies.

You're expected to relate your learning in this unit to preparation for your research project in the parallel part of Unit Four. Tutorial and workshop support helps you do this.

Unit Four - Independent Research Project (IRP)

Unit Four has two parts. Part One is undertaken in parallel with Unit  in year one. Part Two is devoted to independent study and the development and completion of your research project in year two.

Part One

Part One focuses on developing your research project proposal. It involves directed reading or viewing, the formulation of specific research questions and methods, and the production of a literature review (annotated bibliography) that forms part of your draft research project proposal. Your proposal's development is supported through increasingly student-directed seminars and group (as well as personal) tutorials, plus written guidance on the required contents of the proposal document. You'll explore issues of purpose, validity and feasibility in methodological and resource terms, negotiating external links, exchanges and access arrangements as required.

At the end of year one (weeks 28-30) draft project proposals, including the literature review, are presented for interim assessment through consultation with your tutor and group seminar feedback, and you receive written feedback confirming your plans and/or advising revisions.

Part Two

All projects, including a commitment to the forms of your submission and appropriate ongoing supervision/tutorial arrangements, are agreed at the outset of year two.

A symposium shared across the MRes pathways presents and discusses all project proposals. A second group event involving invited professionals occurs early in the spring term of year two (prior to the PhD applications point). This event provides a discussion forum challenging you to recognise and debate key questions arising from your research project work to date.

Throughout the second year you lead interim presentations about your research, in person at seminar groups and individual tutorials and online, discussing progress, challenges and findings, and issues of form, audience and dissemination. A third event hosted at LUX at the end of year two presents and disseminates the project outcomes.

At the end of Unit Four you're assessed through presentation of your realised research project in the agreed forms, the project proposal document, and a report describing and evaluating changes and progress. Your marks for Units Three and Four determine the classification of your MRes award.

Staff

Filipa  Ramos

Filipa Ramos

Associate Lecturer, MRes Art: Exhibition Studies and MRes Art: Moving Image

Maeve  Connolly

Maeve Connolly

Associate Lecturer, MRes Art: Moving Image

Joanne  Morra

Joanne Morra

Critical Studies Tutor, BA Fine Art.

Uriel  Orlow

Uriel Orlow

Associate Lecturer, MRes Art: Moving Image

Ruth  Maclennan

Ruth Maclennan

Associate Lecturer, MRes Art: Moving Image

Maria  Palacios Cruz

Maria Palacios Cruz

Visiting Lecturer, MRes Art: Moving Image

Rachel  Moore

Rachel Moore

Visiting Lecturer, MRes Art: Moving Image

Pathway Leader, Moving Image: Duncan White
Course Leader for MRes: Art and Pathway Leader for Theory & PhilosophyChris Kul-Want
Associate LecturerRuth Maclennan

How to apply

Opportunities for all

We are committed to making university education an achievable option for a wider range of people and to supporting all of our students in achieving their potential both during and after their courses.

We welcome applications from people with disabilities. If you have a disability (e.g. mobility difficulties, sensory impairments, medical or mental health conditions or Asperger’s syndrome) we strongly encourage you to contact us on disability@arts.ac.uk or +44 (0)20 7514 6156 so that we can plan the right support for you. All enquiries are treated confidentially. To find out more, visit our Disability & Dyslexia webpages.

Entry requirements

The standard entry requirements for this course are as follows:

*          An honours degree OR

*          An equivalent EU / international qualification.

APEL - Accreditation of Prior (Experiential) Learning

Exceptionally applicants who do not meet these course entry requirements may still be considered. The course team will consider each application that demonstrates additional strengths and alternative evidence. This might, for example, be demonstrated by:

*          Related academic or work experience

*          The quality of the personal statement

*          A strong academic or other professional reference

*          OR a combination of these factors.

Each application will be considered on its own merit but we cannot guarantee an offer in each case.

English Language Requirements

IELTS level 7.0 or above, with at least 6.0 in reading, writing, listening and speaking (please check our main English Language requirements webpage).

Selection criteria

The application, independent project proposal and supporting material will be assessed for:

  • Evidence of skills and experience appropriate to the proposed field of enquiry
  • Effective communication of the intentions, purposes and issues in the proposal
  • The level of contextual awareness and expression of perspective in the project proposal
  • The potential for realisation of the stated objectives within the timeframe of the course and envisaged resources
  • Awareness of the range and nature of challenges implied.

The interview: for those applicants selected following submission of the form, indicative proposal and supporting work. The interview is used to evaluate the extent to which a candidate demonstrates:

  • The capacity for independent research
  • Appropriate background knowledge and critical abilities
  • Awareness of the cultural and social context within which their interests/work is situated
  • Appropriate communication skills
  • A preparedness to participate collaboratively in debate and presentation.

What we are looking for

We are seeking imaginative, resourceful individuals who are committed to exploring art practice.

Making your application

For EU applicants concerned about Brexit, please see our dedicated page: Brexit Information for Students.

You should apply by clicking on the link to the direct form below. The application form can be saved as you fill it out, so you do not need to complete it all at once. You will also have the chance to review all the information and make any necessary amendments before you submit the application form.

Start your application now

Central Saint Martins does not accept applications for deferred entry. You should therefore apply in the year you wish to study.

Before you apply, please take time to read the guidance below. You will be asked to provide the following information when completing the online application form:

General information

Personal details (including legal full name, date of birth, nationality, addresses)

Current English language level

Current and/or previous education and qualification details

Employment history

Personal Statement

Your personal statement should be approximately 500 words in length, and outline the following:

  • Why you are interested in the course?
  • What aspects of your experience relate to the course?
  • How will the course impact on your future career?

Indicative Project Proposal

To apply for this course we require that you write an initial project proposal. This proposal should demonstrate your critical understanding and thinking. The course sets no boundaries to the fields of possible interest, and it is understood that proposals will evolve and change during the course (you will probably need to write between 800 and 1,000 words).

Summary of proposed project
  • Briefly describe what you are interested in undertaking and developing; describe the overall aims, objectives and rationale of the project.
  • Briefly explain your proposed approach and the methods for structuring your project and ideas
  • Highlight any problems you may encounter and how you hope to solve them.
  • Indicate key texts and sources. What resources will be involved? For example, access to archives, collections, specialist networks etc.
Methods and resources
Sources and references
Any final points
  • Please briefly indicate any particular questions or further points in relation to your proposal.

Previous work

  • You will be required to submit digital examples of previous written work and/or documentary material relevant to your research interests.

We cannot consider your application if you do not provide all of the information above.

Application deadline

We recommend you apply by the end of May to avoid disappointment.   We reserve the right to close applications earlier than the deadline above subject to spaces available.

There are two ways international students can apply:

  • One of our official representatives in your country
  • A direct application.

If you are applying directly you click on the link to the direct form below. The application form can be saved as you fill it out, so you do not need to complete it all at once. You will also have the chance to review all the information and make any necessary amendments before you submit the application form.

For further advice on how to apply please visit the UAL International Application page.

Start your application now

Central Saint Martins does not accept applications for deferred entry. You should therefore apply in the year you wish to study.

Before you apply, please take time to read the guidance below. You will be asked to provide the following information when completing the online application form:

General information

Personal details (including legal full name, date of birth, nationality, addresses)

Current English language level

Current and/or previous education and qualification details

Employment history

Personal Statement

Your personal statement should be approximately 500 words in length, and outline the following:

  • Why you are interested in the course?
  • What aspects of your experience relate to the course?
  • How will the course impact on your future career?

Indicative Project Proposal

To apply for this course we require that you write an initial project proposal. This proposal should demonstrate your critical understanding and thinking. The course sets no boundaries to the fields of possible interest, and it is understood that proposals will evolve and change during the course (you will probably need to write between 800 and 1,000 words).

Summary of proposed project
  • Briefly describe what you are interested in undertaking and developing; describe the overall aims, objectives and rationale of the project.
  • Briefly explain your proposed approach and the methods for structuring your project and ideas
  • Highlight any problems you may encounter and how you hope to solve them.
  • Indicate key texts and sources. What resources will be involved? For example, access to archives, collections, specialist networks etc.
Methods and resources
Sources and references
Any final points
  • Please briefly indicate any particular questions or further points in relation to your proposal.

Previous work

  • You will be required to submit digital examples of previous written work and/or documentary material relevant to your research interests.

Immigration history check

Whether you are applying online or through a UAL representative you will need to complete an immigration history check to establish whether you are eligible to study at UAL.  If you do not complete the check we will not be able to proceed with your application.

We cannot consider your application if you do not provide all of the information above.

Application deadline

We recommend you apply by the end of May to avoid disappointment.   We reserve the right to close applications earlier than the deadline above subject to spaces available.


After you apply

Communicating with you

After you have successfully submitted your application, you will receive an email confirming we have successfully received your application and providing you with your login details for the UAL Portal.  We will request any additional information from you, including inviting you to upload documents or book an audition, through the portal.  You should check your UAL Portal regularly for any important updates and requests.

What happens next

Initial application check

We check your application to see if you meet the standard entry requirements for the course.  Following a review of the application documents, successful applicants will be invited to an interview, either in person or by skype.

Interview

The interview is used to evaluate the extent to which a candidate demonstrates:

  • The capacity for independent research
  • Appropriate background knowledge and critical abilities
  • Awareness of the cultural and social context within which their interests/work is situated
  • Appropriate communication skills
  • A preparedness to participate collaboratively in debate and presentation.

How we notify you of the outcome of your application

You will receive the outcome of your application through the UAL Portal.

Fees & Funding

Home/EU fee

Tuition fees for 2018/19: £4,750 per year. Please note that fees for second year of study will be subject to inflationary increase.

£500 per annum discount for all students who have completed a PG Dip/Cert or an undergraduate course including Grad Dip/Cert, at UAL.

You can pay course tuition fees in instalments for this course.

ELQ

Home/EU students whose chosen course is at a level equivalent to, or lower than, a qualification that they already hold, would will be charged the fees shown above, plus an additional £1,100 (called the 'ELQ' fee). Students in receipt of Disabled Students' Allowances (DSAs) are exempt from ELQ fees and will pay the original fee, regardless of the highest qualification held. If you have a query regarding the ELQ fee, please use this register your interest form.

International fee

Tuition fees for 2018/19: £10,920 per year.

£500 per annum discount for all students who have completed a PG Dip/Cert or an undergraduate course including Grad Dip/Cert, at UAL.

You can pay course tuition fees in instalments for this course.

Additional costs

In addition to tuition fees you are very likely to incur additional costs such as travel expenses and the cost of materials. Please read the information on our additional costs page.

Accommodation

Find out about the accommodation options available and how much they will cost.

Scholarships and awards

There are a number of scholarships and awards available to students on this course. Use our search tool to find out more information.

Scholarship search

Careers and alumni

Our Postgraduate Art Programme offers valuable opportunities to build transferable professional knowledge and skills. The exchange of perspectives with others through shared units, reading groups and debates helps establish stimulating and productive networks.

The focus on proposing and developing a major independent programme of study is supported by a shared professional practice lecture series featuring guest speakers plus opportunities to attend symposia and critique work in progress across subject areas. The Postgraduate Art Programme has wide-ranging links with professional organisations, collections and galleries, and includes opportunities for interaction and networking according to your personal career direction.

MRes Art: Moving Image is unique in its relationship with LUX, the national public arts agency that explores ideas around artists' moving image and supports practice through a range of activities including distribution of works, exhibitions, education publishing and research. The pathway is supported by professional expertise from LUX and benefits from its extensive connections.

MRes Art: Moving Image anticipates both academic and professional outcomes for its students, enabling graduates to pursue a range of careers in artists' moving image culture. Some may opt for academic scholarship through doctoral research. Others may choose or continue in professions within curating and film programming, distribution, publishing and journalism. Possible career contexts include festivals, biennales, galleries, museums and archives. And for some graduates MRes Art: Moving Image will enable further enrichment of their own practice as artists working with moving image.

For details of the wide range of careers support provided for students, please visit the Student Jobs And Careers section.

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