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Dr Jennifer Good

Title
SL BA Photojournalism / MA Photojournalism & Documentary Photography
College
London College of Communication
Email address
Tags
Researcher Research
Jennifer  Good

Biography

Dr Jennifer Good is an Acting Course Leader and Senior Lecturer in the history and theory of photojournalism and documentary photography at London College of Communication. Her research interests include photography and violence, psychoanalysis and memory, as well as pedagogies of reading, writing and power.

She is a member of the Photography and the Archive Research Centre (PARC), the PARC War and Conflict Research Hub, and the International Association of Visual Culture (IAVC).

Jennifer originally trained as a printmaker and textile artist. Her PhD in Visual Culture focussed on the photographic representation of terrorism, with a special interest in trauma theory, psychoanalysis and the idea of public memory. She was formerly a faculty member at the Foundation for International Education, and a researcher at the UK Government Art Collection.

She is the author of Photography and September 11th: Spectacle, Memory, Trauma (Bloomsbury, 2015) co-author of Understanding Photojournalism (Bloomsbury, 2017) and co-editor of Mythologizing the Vietnam War: Visual Culture and Mediated Memory (CSP, 2014). She writes regularly for photography publications and speaks internationally about her research.

Jennifer’s research practice is concerned with the photographic representation of conflict, specifically on psychological and psychoanalytical levels. Ideas around the perceived dichotomy between visual and textual modes of representation are also central, and a concern with the ways in which photography is written about in academic and other discourses underlies all her work. 

As well as photojournalism and documentary photography, she has also published work in the area of pedagogic research, with a particular interest in students’ reading and writing of theoretical texts, and in the idea of ‘critical paralysis’.

Teaching

Current research students

  • Jessie Bond, Conflict and the Photobook: exploring how the photobook provides a space to better understand the realities of war and the kind of looking it allows (Lead supervisor)
  • Alessandra Ferrini, GADDAFI IN ROME: DISSECTING A NEOCOLONIAL SPECTACLE How does dissection as a methodology contribute to the understanding of the historiographic potential of newsfeeds? (Joint supervisor)
  • Manuel Francisco Prazeres Coelho de Sousa, Statements of the self: ethics, collaboration, and contemporary documentary portraiture practices (Joint supervisor)