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The sensuous, scintillating history of the rose in fashion

Written by Centre for Fashion Curation
Published date 08 September 2020

We are delighted to announce the publication of Ravishing: The Rose in Fashion i(Yale University Press) by Amy de la Haye, professor of dress history and curatorship at London College of Fashion and joint director of the University of the Arts research Centre for Fashion Curation.

The book accompanies an exhibition of the same title, co-curated with Colleen Hill, rescheduled to open early 2021 at the Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology (MFIT), New York. Both projects foreground MFIT’s collection of innovative and challenging designs, dating from the most exquisite 18th century hand-painted 18th century silks to the latest gender-neutral catwalk trends, whilst recognising that almost anyone can wear, and feel transformed by wearing, one or more fresh or artificial roses.

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Front cover image: Noir Kei Ninomiya, rose ensemble with fresh roses headdress, Paris, Autumn/Winter 2019.

ybook jacket rear showing roses

Back cover image: Nick Knight ‘Roses from My Garden’ posted on Instagram ‘Sunday 8th July, 2018, hand coated pigment print, 2019 (77.4  63.5 cms

Ravishing: The Rose in Fashion contains a foreword by Dr Valerie Steele, Director of MFIT; a conversation ‘On Roses’ between Amy de la Haye and Nick Knight, whose sublime images of ‘Roses From My Garden’ are featured. Colleen Hill provides a chapter on the 18th century; Jonathan Faiers on the cultural contexts of the rose; Geoffrey Munn on fine jewellery and Mairi MacKenzie on scent. Amy de la Haye writes a detailed Introduction, ‘Permanent Botanicals: The Fashioning of Artificial Roses’ and chapters on the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries.

Read more about how the rose has influenced the way we look, feel and fantasize in Amy's article for Yale books.

Follow Amy de la Haye's research on Instagram