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Graduate Spotlight: MA Fashion Design Technology Womenswear Graduate Gergei Erdei

lcfma17wwgergeierdei
lcfma17wwgergeierdei
Gergei Erdei – MA Fashion Design Techonology womenswear, 2017; Photography by Felix Cooper, styling by Anders Sølvsten Thomsen, hair Roxy Attard, make-up artist Celia Burton; models Yasmina Atta, Tschan Andrews, Anna Pye.
Written by
Rosie Higham-stainton
Published date
09 February 2017

Ahead of our LCFMA17 MA Fashion Design Technology Womenswear catwalk show on Thursday 16 Feburary 2017 at 7pm (watch it live streamed here), we caught up with the participating graduates to discuss their final collections and why they chose to study at London College of Fashion. Gergei Erdei’s collection focuses on antiquity and femininity. Here he tells us about it.

Gergei Erdei - MA Fashion Design Techonology womenswear, 2017; Photography by Felix Cooper, styling by Anders Sølvsten Thomsen, hair Roxy Attard, make-up artist Celia Burton; models Yasmina Atta, Tschan Andrews, Anna Pye.

Gergei Erdei – MA Fashion Design Techonology womenswear, 2017; Photography by Felix Cooper, styling by Anders Sølvsten Thomsen, hair Roxy Attard, make-up artist Celia Burton; model Yasmina Atta

Tell us about your final collection?

The collection is inspired by the shellworks of the Victorian era, all these amazing miniature sculptures that they put under bell jars. I liked how the bell jars are protecting all of these compositions, so it’s like an invisible armour. In the collection  did a lot of embroidery, based on shell sculptures, which almost became the bell jar for a human being, protecting the woman underneath. And I also had a second point of inspiration which was called Sailor’s Valentines. These were very small, sentimental shell images that sailors gave to their lovers in the 19th century.  I thought it interesting that a very tough segment of society were doing such an emotional thing. I thought it was really interesting compared to women and men nowadays, with apps and the new ways people find love today. I have a lot of friends who are struggling with this – they still remember, from their grandparents, how they people used to meet and had a nice way of finding each other. But now it’s not happening like this.

In the clothes I use a lot of antique fabrics that have this faded, little bit romantic mood. I’m always collecting antique fabrics when I am travelling. So I use a lot of gold, brass and embroidery  from 19th century naval uniforms. I’m also using some family objects which are related to my childhood and the past. I love these materials because they have a texture and faded charm which you can’t really reproduce. You can’t repeat what a hundred years will do to brass material. So most of these pieces are on-off, not for reproduction.

Reflecting back on your MA, and thinking of any prospective students thinking about starting an MA, what would be your top three tips/bits of advice to them?

I can see a lot of students don’t plan in advance. For instance, in my case, I budgeted but of course it was much more. And of course there is a bit of a competition because some people they can go home to produce, and others can’t.

What have you found the most enjoyable and interesting parts of your course? And what have you found the most challenging?

For me it’s always time keeping, because I’m using a lot of handwork and it takes ages. Obviously, if I were to have a team to help me it would be much easier. And I did work with some amazing people and my friends did help me a lot but it’s still hard to keep time.

The most enjoyable? The whole course was really amazing, really supportive, really open minded, designwise especially. I really feel that in London and during the course, I discovered the vein of design I want to follow. And I found my own identity and way to do things and a kind of personal style.

What was your favourite thing about studying in London?

London is really inspiring, I love this city. I lived here before my course, and also my friends are living here from the same university in Hungary. So, it was nice to be in a city where you know people so you don’t feel alone. I’m from Budapest, and antiques are not appreciated like they are here; and here there is a lot of places to source from. Also the whole Victorian era has been really inspiring, which is everywhere you look in London.

Describe your work…

  • The collection is handcrafted.
  • It’s cleverly crowded. I really like when something is a bit overcrowded but not in an unorganised way. So there is something you’re meant to focus on and everything else is supporting that and drawing attention to that piece.
  • Colour palette is really important, I like the picturesque colour mood. I like matching colours and everything has this antique-painting mood.
  • Antique fabrics – these are really important and impossible to copy or find again.

Do you have a muse? 

I don’t have an imaginary woman who I am designing for. I think the products are choosing the customer. So people who aren’t interested in art or antiquities, are never really going to be interested in the product. So I guess someone artistic, who will appreciate the details. I don’t have an age group. I think any age can wear the product. It’s more about personality. I would say they should be a woman though, not a girl.

What are your future plans and how do you think the course will help you to realise these plans?

I want to gain more experience in a bigger company, in London. I don’t plan to set up by own brand yet. I want to get more experience and connections first.