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Lucie Brosson: BSc Creative Computing

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Image of Lucie Brosson soldering
Image of Lucie Brosson soldering
Lucie Brosson soldering in the Physical Computing Lab, BSc Creative Computing, 2021, UAL Creative Computing Institute | Photograph: Alys Tomlinson
Written by
Rachel McClure
Published date
21 November 2021

Lucie is in her final year of the BSc (Hons) Creative Computing at UAL Creative Computing Institute.

Here, she tells us about her UAL experience, the politics of creative computing and the concept of digital death.

Image of Lucie Brosson smiling whilst looking at her laptop
Lucie Brosson in the Physical Computing Lab, BSc Creative Computing, 2021, UAL Creative Computing Institute | Photograph: Alys Tomlinson

Before joining the UAL Creative Computing Institute, Lucie undertook a foundation year in France and the first year of BA (Hons) Fine Art (Drawing) at Camberwell College of Arts.

"The Fine Art course was really interesting, but I realised I needed more knowledge of computing to pursue what I wanted to do. I became aware of CCI the year before it was created, and it felt like destiny. I knew I wanted to transfer to this course. It seemed so innovative and creative."

The richness of the people I’ve met at CCI has truly made my university experience. Being surrounded by such high-achieving creatives makes you want to shoot for the stars.

On her initial perception of computing, Lucie explains that she wasn’t aware of just how political the practice could be.

"When I first became interested in computing, I thought it was a very non-political subject. But then I joined CCI, and I started to realise the social aspect of computing. How, in a world where technology is so prevalent, social justice in computing is primordial.

For my final project, I’m exploring the concept of digital death. Social media and data creation are still very young, and most users are still alive. But even during the 40-ish years of its existence, many users have unfortunately passed away. I want to concentrate on how we, as a society, will cope with the data of the dead and all the questions surrounding it.”

Lucie Brosson working on her laptop
Lucie Brosson working on her laptop, BSc Creative Computing, 2021, UAL Creative Computing Institute | Photograph: Alys Tomlinson

So, what’s next for this budding creative computing practitioner?

“Next year, I’m planning to do a Master’s degree in Digital Design at Olivier de Serres in Paris. I want the opportunity to pursue other research interests such as war and AI. Or I might focus on digital death more profoundly through different mediums like bots and physical computing. After my Master’s, I might continue in academia if I find a thesis that interests me. If not, I will pursue my artistic practice.”

Here's Lucie's advice for anyone thinking of doing the BSc Creative Computing at UAL CCI.

"Go to the in-class sessions and don’t be scared to talk with your tutors about their research and background, you could discover a new interest. Also, it might be my fine art background speaking, but get a sketchbook and note your ideas in it, it could become an incredible project in the future."

Lucie Brosson packing away her laptop holding a notebook and wearing an 'I Love Creative Computing' tote bag
Lucie Brosson in the Physical Computing Lab, BSc Creative Computing, 2021, UAL Creative Computing Institute | Photograph: Alys Tomlinson