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Dr Johanna Love

Title
Pathway Leader MA Visual Arts (Printmaking)
College
Camberwell College of Arts
Tags
Researcher Research
Johanna  Love

Biography

Johanna Love is an artist, academic and researcher living in London, UK. She is interested in making images that operate at the limits of human perception and often invoke ideas of the technological sublime, through print, drawing and photographic languages, often combining all together, using landscape and architectural subject matter, to generate unstable, shifting material surfaces, and visually complex and unfathomable images. Here, the fractured, open and complex images offer an arena within which we can contemplate themes of time, memory and mortality.

In 2013 she attained a PhD in the field of Fine Art at Chelsea college of Arts, with a thesis titled Dust: Exploring new ways of viewing the photographic printed image. Previous to this, she completed a fellowship in Printmaking at The Royal Academy Schools between 2001-5. She exhibits nationally and internationally; continues to contribute to key debates through exhibitions and international conferences and symposiums across fine art printmaking, drawing and photography contexts.

Over the last few years Johanna has been working in collaboration with senior scientists at Natural History Museum, London and the Interplanetary Sciences Archive at UCL. At the Natural History Museum Johanna works with Electronmicroscopy to examine samples of dust collected from her families old home in the centre of Hamburg, Germany. The house sits in the centre of Hamburg and withstood the intense bombing of WW2. Johanna's interests are in the dust as an archive of time and place; of history and memory; and also of the discord between the scientific image and human perception. She is currently making large-scale drawings to re-think and re- negotiate the scientific image and generate new readings of time, scale and weight.

Past research students

  • Phil Hall-Patch, Sculpture With Photography: How might camera-less photography provide a corollary to ephemeral/ time-based sculpture? (Joint supervisor)

Subjects

Fine art
Photography