• CollegeCSM
  • Start dateSeptember 2018
  • Course length2 years

M ARCH: Architecture

In a world where established customs, systems and structures are increasingly unstable there is a need for a different kind of architectural thinking - one that identifies and exploits opportunities, and addresses the challenges of contemporary society.

The M ARCH: Architecture course is uniquely positioned at Central Saint Martins to draw on the dynamic design thinking and making skills from a range of art and design practices, as well as providing you with the second degree in the professional pathway toward registration as an architect – commonly referred to as Part Two.

This course is part of the Spatial Practices Programme. 

Great reasons to apply

  • Undertake the second degree in the professional pathway toward registration as an architect. The M ARCH: Architecture is prescribed by the Architects Registration Board and successful graduates of the Course will therefore achieve Part 2 of the professional qualification for architects in the UK
  • Engage in professional practice: as part of your studies you are required to undertake 10 weeks of industry placement. Through this, you will have the opportunity to engage with and understand both existing forms of practice and to posit new ways of working
  • M ARCH: Architecture has been designed to enable you to pursue your studies whilst also undertaking part-time employment, internships or care responsibilities. You are expected to commit 30 hours per week to your studies; your taught input will normally be scheduled over a maximum of two to three days per week during term time
  • Prepare yourself for entry into a changing profession the practice of architecture continues to go through changes, M ARCH: Architecture offers you the opportunity to engage with the challenges of the future now
  • Work closely with communities, clients and social enterprise projects and opportunities on the Course will bring you into contact with communities, clients and social enterprises which seek to open up new approaches to your role as a future architect
  • Collaborate with other professions architectural practice constantly requires that you are able to communicate and collaborate with other professionals. M ARCH: Architecture creates opportunities for students to work with other professions, both within the College and outside.
Adrea
Adrea

Adrea

Alistair
Alistair

Alistair

Arts and crafts
Arts and crafts

Arts and crafts 

Conor
Conor

Conor

Fountain
Fountain

Fountain

Jo
Jo

Jo

Laurence
Laurence

Laurence

Marc
Marc

Marc

Matt
Matt

Matt

Nicholas Rurban
Nicholas Rurban

Nicholas Rurban

Single Tower
Single Tower

Single Tower

Watts
Watts

Watts

Willam
Willam

Willam

Zhan
Zhan

Zhan

M ARCH: Architecture on Instagram

  • Join @csm_news and @ultrafabrics_inc for Blueprint for the Future 17-19 July showcasing the best architecture grad talent from around London. Special talk and drinks Rethinking Pedagogy: Live Projects in architectural School 18 July 5.30pm with @atjuliaking and MArch Grad Conor Morris. Info and RSVP 👉see invite #BPFTF
  • . LIGHTHOUSE OPENING TONIGHT 5TH JULY 2018 7PM @whitehousedagenham By Conor Morris . The Lighthouse is a independent cinema and demonstration project based in the carpark of CREATE London's property 'The White House' in Dagenham, East London. . It is Stage One of a wider project, called 'Transforming Spaces' that aims to highlight the possible uses of unused or poorly used space throughout the city. It does this by proposing low cost structures that can house a social or leisure function for the surrounding area, such as the cinema which will be showing films for free throughout the summer. These structures aim to be built with the local residents so that it becomes a two stage process. . Firstly the process of working with residents, learning and sharing skills, allowing people to affect and change their environment, whilst also creating a space for people to meet. . Secondly the function of the build itself, such as tbe cinema but also the aim that the spaces could be eventually linked to social contracts, such as providing a space for local people to perform or show their work or providing employment for specific groups in the area. . Opening: The Lighthouse will be opening with weekly film screenings from Thursday 5th of July. Please join us for the opening at 7pm on Thursday 5th, please bring some food and drinks and we will be cooking from a BBQ and eating dinner in The Light House. .
  • #KXclay
  • Kings Cross clay fired at different temperatures. Looking good! #KXclay
  • Processing clay from Kings Cross building sites #KXclay
  • First year MArch students have started the summer workshop at the #skipgarden with CSM ceramics. Watch this space! @canovenove @gregory_ross @takeshi_hayatsu @duncanhooson @allumandy_ceramics #KXclay
  • Congratulations to Gemma Holyoak Hamblin winner of the inaugural Spatial Practices Jyothi Pillay Memorial Award 🥇 for her project State Tactics. @gemmaleigh_h . Jyothi Pillay was a curious, independent, and talented young architect. In all her projects there was a deep curiosity and willingness to engage with other people in the community, often those marginalized or underrepresented, and to use her architectural knowledge and expertise as a force for assisting people. . In memory of Jyothi, the Programme has established a Memorial Prize to be awarded annually to a graduating student who demonstrates a talent, compassion and sensitivity for community engagement.
  • . Dartford: A New Localism By Joseph Hamblin . Can we seize the opportunities offered in the localism act to drive development in our towns . There is a clear political divide between out town and cities, this is arguably in part down to our economic system being heavily balanced in favour of our urban centres. Pioneering the move towards a new form of localism is Preston Council. They are rejecting todays typical neo-liberal procurement practices and instead shaping the market in favour of local SME’s. Their progressive tactics are broadening the ownership of the economy, offering opportunities for innovation on a neighbourhood scale and making Preston more democratic. . If this economic system were to become common place how would our towns regenerate in support of it? . These questions are played out in Dartford, a town on the edges of London, which currently has significant investment into town centre developments. . In the face of the mass demolition of Lowfield Street - a former high street which was bought by Tesco and abandoned 15 years later - I propose a mass salvage mission, one where we pick up the pieces left behind by Tesco and with them we build a civic institution as a marker of Dartford’s new beginning. The proposition comes first at the neighbourhood scale, then focusses on a new civic square and market hall as the foundation of the town centre. . Key collaborators in the work are the local museum and archives, Town Ward Councillors and Dartford Big Local. Each scale of the proposition is aimed towards a mixture of these collaborators and in some instances has been designed in collaboration with them.
  • State Tactics by @gemmaleigh_h . Can Southwark Council deliver homes that integrate with the existing fabric and involve local residents and businesses in the area’s regeneration? . With a target to build 20,000 homes across the Old Kent Road opportunity area, the latest draft of the Area Action plan outlines how these will be delivered through ‘mixed use’ developments across retail and industrial sites. Thirty percent of the opportunity area is council owned housing built in the 1960s-70s by the LCC and GLC, which are low density and in major need of repair. The regeneration team at Southwark Council are currently exploring options for the redevelopment of the Tustin Estate which “could involve the large scale demolition of the majority of the estate”. How can Southwark Council deliver density across the opportunity area through infill housing whilst upgrading their existing estates? By establishing a studio on the estate, one where planners can hot-desk from and local residents can run events, council officers can initiate a network of interested residents and businesses - challenging the technocratic nature of their practice. Projects from existing funding streams for community projects and major works can be planned alongside one another for the estate's renewal at different scales. With improvements to existing housing and residents involved with the estate’s renewal, infill housing can increase the site’s density and integrate with the social and tectonic fabric of the estate. . #oldkentroad #tustinestate #pilgrimswayprimary #londonhousing #planning
  • The show is on the road and the catalog is out! Designed to make you happy by the wonderful @mmmaaarrrcccooosss and @christopher.a.lawson. Come visit and claim your copy. . Degree Show 2 is open until this Saturday. #csmemerge #csm2018 #studyarchitectureatartschool
  • Performing Planning . How can performance challenge the way we address planning and policy? By @matthewedwardbrown . This project explores the public enactment of planning through performance. If we consider planning as an urban right which should be universally engaged with, publicly celebrated, and constantly challenged, then planning can be a form of critique as well as direct action. By understanding planning as a form of performance, the project explores another way of city making based on actions, using performance, events and curious objects to generate inventive responses to policy. This approach is a rebuttal to the notion of planning as stifling and bureaucratic, instead arguing that by setting out how we want to live in the future, planning develops the rules for our freedom. . Through a live project situated in Croydon, Performing Planning explores a new home for three meanwhile organisations: Croydon Saffron Central, Turf Projects and Beats Learning, using design to highlight the tensions of this sharing dynamic. The combination of these organisations is a performance in itself, like the proposed construction and phasing of the architectural proposal. By making the burdens and opportunities of meanwhile projects explicit, the inevitable conflicts that will arise are acknowledged from the offset. The architectural design embraces stains, risk, adaptability, and acknowledging tensions as design tools. . Through this form of situated practice, the project shows how the agency of student work can nurture new forms of practice and explores how architects and other spatial practitioners can play a more critical role in the development of the city. On a wider scale, it speculates about the role performance can play in the public discussion around planning policy. . Croydon Saffron Central - #croydonsaffroncentral, @badgerjellyfish, Turf Projects, @turfprojects, _matthewrust
  • . The Hackney Repair Archive by Dan Wilkins @hackney_repair_archive . Creativity and design’s role in the public realm as state power for our civic spaces diminishes . The Hackney Repair Archive (HRA) is an initiative to bring the art & design of repair to the green and public spaces of Hackney. We believe in the power of community, design and creativity to deliver positive change in our cities. The work we do seeks to broaden the scope of art, design and creativity in the public realm. We work with communities and stakeholders to deliver catalytic actions, creative repairs and interventions in the neglected and overlooked parts of our city with a particular focus on green spaces and public parks. Can we reframe the act of maintenance as a creative discipline and in doing so find new economic models to protect our public resources? Using Hackney Downs as an incubator site to test methodologies for a borough wide initiative this project explores ways of using community action and design to protect under and unused council assets for community benefit. The architectural proposition centers around the reimagining of Hackney Downs park, a much loved but under resourced public park in the centre of the borough. Looking towards alternative forms of protection, production and maintenance. Can we find positivity in the midst of a public funding crisis to develop a rhizome of projects that engage communities in shaping their cities. By redirecting funding from the realms arts and education the HRA reframes the production, maintenance and use of public space as a form of socially engaged arts practice. From small-scale actions of repair and inclusion to proposing new systems of management and repair for existing buildings and infrastructure HRA is working with a number of community groups and charities to secure a new future for the park. . www.hackneyrepairarchive.com
  • . FINISHING TOUCHES Private view Tue 19th June . #csmemerge #csm2018 #architecture
  • A Network of Members Rooms for Precarious Workers by Amy O'Shaughnessy @ames9 How do Service workers in transient conditions operate across the City? This is an exploration into the invisible workforce of London. The nature of work is changing; precarious work is on the increase. In Post Fordist Capitalism the organization of service labour is increasingly facilitated by outsourced contracts and virtual technologies. Many are labelling this resurgence as the gig economy, and as this type of work becomes the norm, so too do new forms of organization. Two research studies; How London Works, undertaken whilst on placement at the Greater London Authority and How the Instant City Works, a research project at Glastonbury festival 2017 traced the threads between essential goods and services, people and skills needed to supply cultural economies. The studies progressed into an understanding of the individual role of the service worker within London through the lens of two active unions IWGB and UVW, to propose a new typology of member’s rooms for workers that provide spaces for self organization, mutual assurance, solidarity and ultimately to redistribute value to the service worker. Inspired by workers shelters like the Cabmen’s Shelter, a proposed network of satellite members rooms provide spaces to help overcome the isolation and individualization of the “entrepreneurs” of the gig-economy. Located on street edges and corners where nodes are informally produced through the gathering of workers; riders at ‘zone centres’ whilst waiting for the next delivery, or the gathering of cleaners waiting for the bus. Offering spaces for the workers to meet and gather or a sheltered place to hide away, the rooms will provide the basic amenity for the workers and also permanent street infrastructure into London’s high streets.
  • . Party for Youth Democracy by Chirag Patel @chigi321 . Can engaging young people in city production have an impact on our wider political discourse? . The biggest political divide in Britain is age. Age is the new key indicator for voting intention. Combining this with an ageing population and consistently lower voting turn out amongst young people, we begin to see a political imbalance which risks leaving young people marginalised within our society. In order to engage anyone politically you must demonstrate that taking action can create a tangible difference in your own life and the lives of those around them. . Exploring the nature of city making as a political act, a ‘Party for Youth Democracy’ will be held in Beckenham Place Park, south Lewisham. With access to public space increasingly being played out through organised events, the festival will provide an opportunity for young people to create a presence not only physically within the public realm, but also in the conversation about how it is used. . Proposed to work in conjunction with the Young Makers’ Agency (YMA), a youth group based near the park, the festival will be coordinated with a series of workshops, where members will help design, curate and build the festival. The festival will be a vehicle for exposing young people to interesting creative practitioners whilst giving them an opportunity to express their own creativity. . Aiming to make the park more accessible, particularly to local young people, the festival will initially draw new people to the space through event and spectacle, creating a more permanent presence in the park through collective memory and leaving behind positive additions to the park infrastructure which use play, forum and interaction to encourage plurality. . #party #lewisham #youthdemocracy
  • . Island & Land: A Public Place for Socialized Childcare and Park Protection By Jon Shmulevitch . . Can providing an infrastructure for public socialised childcare reinforce citizen led protections for a precious public space? . Graham Street Park in Islington is under threat. The area has been dominated by high end residential development over the past 10 years and the surrounding public space is slowing becoming privatised. A network of local parents have begun to use an abandoned building on the site to practise a form of socialised childcare and in turn have become a voice of the park and a pocket of resistance. The space has come under threat several times in its life and saved by strong public campaigning. The proposal builds upon the current use as a place for childcare while mythologising its history and past struggle in order to reenforce citizen led protection of this vital public asset. Their need for alternative childcare is a reflection of the pressures faced by parents in the UK. Since 2008 costs have risen 48% while wages have followed at 12%. Inner London cost are more than a third more expensive than the rest of UK. Childcare responsibilities stop many from entering the workforce. Traversing and existing the urban landscape is a treacherous task for the parent. The proposal explores what a public space, specifically designed for sharing childcare could be. Our proposal will be celebrated with an temporary floating creche that will be launched this summer on the water of the City Road Basin.
  • . Re-Living Archive: Urban Transformation through the re-enactment of radical historical projects across Tottenham by Shamiso Oneka. @oneka.s . What would it take to decolonise the Institute unbinding it from hegemonies of knowledge, property and access? . What would it take to decolonise the archive? To unbind the institution from existing hegemonies of knowledge, property and access. To relocate and reposition the history of the institution in dialogue with new audiences in the contemporary city. As practitioner-in-residence at the George Padmore Institute, an archive of Black and Asian culture and social activism near Finsbury Park, Shamiso performs in the roles of both provocateur and pragmatist, to challenge normative forms of knowledge gathering and memory preservation. . The project reimagines the Institute as an exploded building, dispersed across the contested civic centre of Tottenham. Reenacting radical legacy projects that grew from within the institute, the project unpacks the archive into a series of programmatic activities that transform the meaning of the archive in relation to the everyday context of city, as another form of civic documentation. Campaigns by the Black Parents Movement are relived as After-School Club; The New Beacon Bookshop is relived as a place on the weekly market on Tottenham Green, and the archival collection is reimagined as a publicly accessible warehouse navigated by a digital catalogue. . The GLA describe Tottenham as “un-paralleled for growth” referring to projects like HS2, the Mayor’s Creative Enterprise Zone initiative and Haringey Development Vehicle. We have seen ‘growth’ and regeneration become synonymous with displacement and social cleansing; in Tottenham where are 78% of the population are non-white British, and the most deprived 4% in the country, ‘Re-Living Archive’ is a critical, collective network of solidarities in the landscapes of heritage and identity. . #heritage #radicalarchive #archive #livingarchive #TheGeorgePadmoreInstitute
  • . In The Making - Where there's muck, there's brass? by Billy Adams and Frederick Wiltshire . How can we, as architects, engage communities through collective making to educate and share skills? . How can a participatory making process empower people to alter, mediate and actively inhabit their environment? . ‘Where there’s muck there’s brass,’ is a phrase that relates to unseen potential. This unseen potential often resides in overlooked and underestimated places, objects, people scenarios and processes. It is the act of finding value in what is seen as useless or undesirable, and capitalising on the fact that these places, people and processes have been neglected in the first place. . Architecture is always ‘in the making’; a constantly evolving phenomenon, not a static object. Appreciating this and encouraging it can lead to an architecture that is agile and democratic. Making can be used as a tool to engage people in the processes of architectural production; from collaboration and participation, through material exploration and design development, to construction and inhabitation. By encouraging and equipping people to intervene in these processes we can be empowered to alter, mediate and actively inhabit our environment, creating a more meaningful collaboration. . @clitterhouse . #frillyandbreddy #clitterhouse #clitterhousefarmproject #making #craft #dirt #brentcrossregen
  • . APPLY NOW - Only 2 Days left to get your applications in for @publicworks_uk Summer School in Denmark. Co-organised with Christian Richards, 1st year MArch student currently on placement at @roskildefestival . For more information check www.publicworksgroup.net or link in bio @publicworks_uk
  • . Night Time Design: A London Strategy by @jehartshorne . How to take a holistic design approach to the twenty four hour city . London is increasingly becoming a twenty-four hour city. The introduction of the night tube and the commissioning of a London Night Czar prompts us, as designers, to reconsider our urban realm holistically. . The night brings complex social, physical and economic conditions that are too often neglected and overlooked by spatial strategists. We prioritise the day and not the night. Under the cover of darkness the night tube supports two different system; one that is for recreational pleasure and the other for the economy.Exploring architectural and urban spaces through design strategy principles and a proposed London Night Time Design Guide, this project reimagines the way our cities physical and social fabric is formed. Architectural proposals are made for transport hubs and public realm; retrofitting Shoreditch High Street Overground station, added to the night tube network in December 2016, and Dalston’s redeveloped intersecting station complex, where Crossrail 2 will connect the two rail hubs. Light, sound, performance and culture drive the design principles, whilst a conscientious approach is made towards precarious and service workers; a constant unrecognised force that guarantee that our cities run successfully during the night. Through my design proposals and principles, London will lead as exemplar in twenty-four hour urban design. London is a 24 hour city and we must design for 24 hours. #csmemerge #degreeshow #csm #csmnews #studyarchitectureatartschool #spatialpractices #london #nighttimeeconomy #nighttube #nighttime #designguide #nighttimedesign
         

Course catalogues

Course detail

The course is offered in an extended full-time mode over two calendar years. This means that your learning is timetabled over 80 weeks across two years. You are expected to commit 30 hours per week to your studies, within which your taught input will normally be scheduled over two/three days. The course has been designed in this way to enable you to pursue your studies, whilst also undertaking part-time employment, internships or care responsibilities.

Course outline

Unit One: Methodologies for Architectural Engagement (60 Credits)

This unit consists of a series of projects intended to allow you to experiment with multidisciplinary approaches, as a means to develop your own design process, and also to test methodologies which can engage the public in architecture and spatial practice: approaches that expand and challenge the conventional role of the architect. These are tested and refined through design propositions. Through this process you are introduced to a variety of research methods and issues relevant to the discipline, which are then directly implemented in the creation/realisation of design work. While developing work for Unit 1 you will be researching and securing an industry placement to be undertaken in Unit 2.

Unit Two: Innovating in Architectural Practice (120 credits)

This unit begins with your Industry Placement. Working with your Mentor you will engage with your chosen practice in order to analyse the ways in which the nature of the practice informs their work. Following your placement you will begin on your Major Project. This is designed to allow you more freedom to explore the way that architectural practice can engage the public through action and intervention. You will define your own brief, based on research and analysis of a chosen site, and develop a real intervention in order to engage the public in a design process and outcome.

Unit Three: Constructing in Detail (20 Credits)

This unit provides an opportunity to explore technical aspects of making and construction in close detail, at 1:1, and with your own hands.  You will engage with the conditions and constraints of structural, constructional and material systems through direct physical experience in a constructional prototyping project. The Unit will involve research and testing, collaborative teamwork and constructional implementation, and will primarily involve working as part of a team. 

Unit Four: Reflecting on Professional Practice (40 Credits)

As a culmination to the course, and following the completion of your major project, this unit will rehearse the integration of key areas of subject knowledge by asking you to engage in professional reporting. This Unit is integrally linked to Unit 2 Innovating in Architectural Practice and will ask you to apply the technical and professional knowledge and understanding that you have gained so far, demonstrating your understanding of the complexity of practice through a retrospective reflection on the detail professional context of your own major project. This Unit seeks to simulate the multiple demands and regulatory controls that professional practice is subjected to – including Planning, Building Control, Cost, Contract, Consultancy and Constructional Documentation.

You have to pass all Units to gain your M Arch.  However, your award classification is based on your achievement in Units 2 and 4 only.

M ARCH Programme Specification 2018/19 (PDF, 99KB)

Industry collaborations

Working with paying clients on live briefs will give you valuable commercial experience which may mean your work being taken forward for production or, if so desired, in the purchase of your intellectual property. All paid projects are conducted within a carefully developed legal framework, which includes student agreements to protect your work and help you realise its commercial value. 

Recent client projects in the Spatial Practices programme include: London Borough of Camden | National Trust | Arup | Mindfolio | New World Development | Grange Hotels | Oasis | Hot Spots Movement |  Redbridge Council | Southbank Centre. Find out more about the Ochirly client project

Once you’ve graduated, you may be picked as part of a small team to work on a live creative brief, organised by our Business and Innovation department, under the supervision of an experienced tutor. This can be a valuable first step in working professionally in a chosen discipline and has resulted in graduates being hired by clients.

Facilities

  • 3D Large: Wood

    3D Large: Wood

    Find out more about our 3D Large: Wood workshop

  • Wood

    Find out more about the Wood facility at Archway

  • CAD

    Find out more about our CAD facilities at King's Cross

Staff

Course Leader: Andreas Lang
Professor of Architecture: Jeremy Till
Senior Lecturer: Oscar Brito
Senior Lecturer: Greg Ross
Associate Lecturer, Architectural Design and Practice: Sarah Featherstone
Associate Lecturer, Architecture, Participation and Practice: David Chambers
Associate Lecturer, Interdisciplinary Practice: Inigo Minns
Associate Lecturer: Liza Fior
Associate Lecturer: Maria Lisogorskaya (Assemble Studio)
Associate Lecturer: Takeshi Hayatsu
Associate Lecturer: Julia King
Associate Lecturer: Carlos Villanueva Brandt
Associate Lecturer: Mathew Leung
Associate Lecturer: Kim Trogal
Associate Lecturer: Rosa Rogina
Postdoctoral Fellow in Spatial Practices: Rebecca Ross 

How to apply

When to apply

We recommend you apply by the end of May to avoid disappointment. Your application will only be considered after you have successfully completed an online application, submitted required documents and a digital portfolio.

We reserve the right to close applications earlier than the deadline above subject to spaces available.

Required information for all postgraduate courses

Before you apply, please take time to read the guidance below. You will be asked to provide the following items and upload documents when completing the online application form:

General information

  • Personal details (including legal full name, date of birth, nationality, addresses);
  • Current English language level;
  • Current and/or previous education and qualification details;
  • Employment history;

Personal Statement

Your personal statement should give us information about yourself and why you want to join the course (between 300-500 words).

  • What are you doing at the moment educationally, professionally, personally?
  • Why do you wish to study on this course?
  • What is your relevant experience?
  • Do you have any relevant skills?
  • Why do you think you are a suitable candidate for acceptance? 

If you do not complete all the required information or upload the necessary documents, we will not be able to proceed with your application and portfolio review.

Start your application now

The application form can be saved as you fill it out, so you do not need to complete it all at once. You will also have the chance to review all the information and make any necessary amendments before you submit the application form.                               

Apply to M ARCH Architecture 

After you have successfully submitted your application online, you will receive an email confirming your application and providing your login details for the UAL Applicant Portal.  Please do log into your applicant portal as this is where we will send you important updates and requests, as well as allowing you to contact us with any questions you may have about your application.

What happens next

If you meet the entry requirements you will be invited to submit a FULL digital portfolio through UAL’s online portfolio review system.

Portfolio

You will need to submit a digital portfolio of up to 20 images with supporting work illustrating your previous experience and practical skills. 

How we notify you of the outcome of your application

You will receive the outcome of your application through the UAL Applicant Portal.

Deferred entry

Please note that CSM does not accept application for deferred entry.

When to apply

We recommend you apply by the end of May to avoid disappointment. Your application will only be considered after you have successfully completed an online application, submitted required documents and a digital portfolio.

We reserve the right to close applications earlier than the deadline above subject to spaces available.

Required information for all postgraduate courses

Before you apply, please take time to read the guidance below. You will be asked to provide the following items and upload documents when completing the online application form:

General Information

  • Personal details (including legal full name, date of birth, nationality, addresses);
  • Current English language level;
  • Current and/or previous education and qualification details;
  • Employment history;

Personal Statement

Your personal statement should give us information about yourself and why you want to join the course (between 300-500 words).

  • What are you doing at the moment educationally, professionally, personally?
  • Why do you wish to study on this course?
  • What is your relevant experience?
  • Do you have any relevant skills?
  • Why do you think you are a suitable candidate for acceptance?

If you do not complete all the required information or upload the necessary documents, we will not be able to proceed with your application and portfolio review.

Start your application now

The application form can be saved as you fill it out, so you do not need to complete it all at once. You will also have the chance to review all the information and make any necessary amendments before you submit the application form.          

Apply to M ARCH Architecture

Alternatively, international applicants can apply through an overseas representative in your country.

After you have successfully submitted your application online, you will receive an email confirming your application and providing your login details for the UAL Applicant Portal.  Please do log into your applicant portal as this is where we will send you important updates and requests, as well as allowing you to contact us with any questions you may have about your application.

Immigration History Check (for International Applications only)

Whether you are applying through a UAL representative or direct application you will need to complete an Immigration History check. If you do not complete the Immigration History Check we will not be able to proceed with your application and portfolio review. 

What happens next

If you meet the entry requirements you will be invited to submit a FULL digital portfolio through UAL’s online portfolio review system.

Portfolio

You will need to submit a digital portfolio of up to 20 images with supporting work illustrating your previous experience and practical skills.

How we notify you of the outcome of your application

You will receive the outcome of your application through the UAL Applicant Portal.

Deferred entry

Please note that CSM does not accept application for deferred entry. 

Entry requirements

Selection is determined by the quality of your application, indicated primarily in your portfolio and written work.

Applicants should have:

  • An Upper First Class (2.1) Honours Degree, or equivalent, from an ARB Prescribed course in architecture (or equivalent);
  • At least one year of relevant professional experience.

 

English language requirements

All classes are conducted in English. If English is not your first language you will be asked to provide evidence of your English language ability in order to apply for a visa, enrol, and start your course. The English language requirement for entry for this course is:

IELTS Academic 6.5 with a minimum of 5.5 in each of the 4 skills (on one single test).

For further information visit the English Language requirements page.

What we look for

M ARCH Architecture at Central Saint Martins is open only to candidates with a first degree in architecture, prescribed by the Architects Registration Board, or equivalent.

Selection criteria

The portfolio review team will evaluate your potential using the following criteria:

  • You have a clear research agenda, related to the aims of the course; 
  • You can analyse a design problem from a number of perspectives, and generate a range of design responses to a particular problem; 
  • You can show an understanding of technology, environment and professional practice and how they relate to architectural designs; 
  • You can show that your personal and professional aspirations are compatible with the aims and objectives of the course; 
  • You can make appropriate choices about the way in which you communicate your design ideas, process and proposals, 
  • You have appropriate levels of skill in drawing, model-making, 3D/CAD, as well as written and verbal presentation skills; 
  • You can demonstrate the necessary fluency in your design process to be able to benefit from the course.

 

Fees and funding

Home/EU fee

£6,865 per year (2018/19). Please note that fees for second year of study will be subject to inflationary increase.

£500 per annum discount for all students who have completed a PG Dip/Cert or an undergraduate course including Grad Dip/Cert, at UAL.

You can pay course tuition fees in instalments for this course. 

ELQ

Home/EU students whose chosen course is at a level equivalent to, or lower than, a qualification that they already hold, would will be charged the fees shown above, plus an additional £1,100 (called the 'ELQ' fee). Students in receipt of Disabled Students' Allowances (DSAs) are exempt from ELQ fees and will pay the original fee, regardless of the highest qualification held. If you have a query regarding the ELQ fee, please use our course enquiry form.

International fee

£16,560 per year (2018/19).

£500 per annum discount for all students who have completed a PG Dip/Cert or an undergraduate course including Grad Dip/Cert, at UAL.

You can pay course tuition fees in instalments for this course. 

Additional costs

In addition to tuition fees you are very likely to incur additional costs such as travel expenses and the cost of materials. Please read the information on our additional costs page.

Accommodation

Find out about the accommodation options available and how much they will cost.

Scholarships search

Careers and alumni

M ARCH: Architecture prepares graduates for employment in architectural practice, urban design, planning, development, and public consultation. In addition, the course provides a solid grounding for continued academic development toward research and PhD study.

Drawing upon extensive industry links within the Spatial Practices Programme, the Course seeks to offer students a unique learning opportunity to engage with live projects and real clients, developing innovative approaches to public engagement and a radical reconsideration of architectural practice.

"In 10 years we probably will not call ourselves an architecture practice, it will be something else entirely" (Architect, Small London-based practice) 
From "The Future for Architects", Building Futures, RIBA, 2010.


Change is inevitable and  being prepared for change is a challenge. M ARCH: Architecture encourages students to take a radical approach to architectural practice; seeking ways in which the architect of the future can work across the industry and beyond.  The course is predicated on the reality that the practice of architecture is changing. There are increasing pressures on the profession from shifts in the way that projects are developed, as well as the changes to the global economy. How will we practice in the future?

"The invasion of the architect's role shouldn't be seen as a threat but as a natural change that can be exploited - we must find our new opportunities and education should shift to accommodate that." (Architect, Large global practice) From "The Future for Architects", Building Futures, RIBA, 2010.