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Network members

Meet the network members collaborating in the group. To express an interest or get in touch, email picturing@arts.ac.uk

Stephan Doering

Network member

Profile

Stephan Doering is professor and of the Department of Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy at the Medical University of Vienna, Austria. He is a medical doctor specialized in psychiatry and psychotherapy, as well as in psychosomatic medicine. Moreover, he is a psychoanalyst and member of the Viennese and the International Psychoanalytical Association (WPV, IPA). He is mainly engaged in clinical research on diagnosis and treatment of patients with personality disorders, particularly borderline. He is president of the European Society for the Study of Personality Disorders (ESSPD) and past president of the International Society for Transference-focused Psychotherapy (ISTFP). He has published numerous research articles and books, and he is editor or associate editor of four international scientific journals.

Statement

Psychoanalysis is the science of the unconscious. To elucidate unconscious processes psychoanalysis traditionally employs heuristic approaches. Doering's specific interest aims at the combination of empirical and heuristic approaches to better understand and make use of implicit interactions as they occur in every relationship including the one between psychoanalyst and patient. Developmental psychology has shown that early parent infant relationships are based on unconscious and non-verbal interaction based on sound of the voice, quality of touch, facial expression of emotion, and smell. The same channels of communication are employed in psychoanalytic treatment, and it is the psychoanalyst's task to foster the patient's development of images, metaphors, and narratives – i.e., to picture the invisible. This corresponds to Freud's famous statement: “Where id was, there ego shall be.” (1933)

Mark Emberton

Network member

Profile

University College London (UCL), London, UK.

Mark Emberton is Professor of Interventional Oncology at UCL, an Honorary Consultant Urologist at University College Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and Founding Pioneer of the charity Prostate Cancer UK.


Professor Emberton’s clinical research is aimed at improving the diagnostic and risk stratification tools and treatment strategies for prostate cancer (PCa); he specialises in the implementation of new imaging techniques, nanotechnologies, bio-engineering materials and non-invasive treatment approaches, such as high intensity focused ultrasound and photo-dynamic therapy.

Professor Emberton’s research has been published in >300 peer-reviewed scientific papers in journals including BMJ, Lancet Oncology and European Urology. He hasalso contributed to the development of guidelines for the management of PCa and lower-urinary tract symptoms, published by the International Society of Geriatric Oncology and the European Association of Urology.


Professor Emberton was appointed Dean of UCL Faculty of Medical Sciences in 2015. In addition he is a member of various urological and medical organisations (AAGUS, BAUS, EAU).  He is a founding partner of London Urology Associates.

Adam Gibson

Network member

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Adam Gibson is a Professor of Medical Physics and has developed the use of optical tomography, electrical impedance tomography and terahertz imaging to image the human body. His particular interest is in multi-modality imaging, to highlight features that cannot be seen by one imaging method alone. Recently, he has become involved in heritage imaging, carrying out multispectral imaging of documents and paintings and applying medical imaging techniques to heritage samples.

Statement

Prof Gibson’s research group develops imaging techniques and applies them to problems across the disciplines. Some techniques, such as medical imaging and scientific photography, are well established in some disciplines but less so in others. There are challenges in adapting and optimising established techniques for new applications, which must be done in a way that is mutually beneficial both for colleagues who develop the technology and the end-user. There are differences and similarities in how different disciplines respond to new advances that must be understood as part of the collaboration process. Developing solutions to imaging problems requires facilitating complex conversations between experts who each understand different parts of the same problem, when no-one understands the whole problem. This is one of the rewarding challenges of working in this area, and one where this network could play an important role.

Paul Goodwin

Network member

Profile

Professor Paul Goodwin is a curator, writer and researcher based in London. He is Director of the Research Centre for Transnational Art, Identity and Nation (TrAIN) at University of the Arts London where he holds the UAL Chair in Contemporary Art and Urbanism. His research and curatorial practice includes a number of internationally significant projects including: Chloe Dewe Mathews: In Search of Frankenstein, British Library 2018; Untitled: Art on the Conditions of Our Time, New Art Exchange, Nottingham, 2017 & Kettle’s Yard, Cambridge 2020; Transfigurations: Artistic and Curatorial Research in an Age of Migrations, Museum of Contemporary Art Barcelona (MACBA) 2014; Migrations: Journeys Into British Art, Tate Britain 2012; Thin Black Line(s), Tate Britain, 2011; Afro Modern (consultant curator), Tate Liverpool, 2010. He is currently leading a new international research consortium – Transnational Arts and Culture Exchange (TrACE) – to develop a major collaborative research project around strengthening resilience and exploring social innovation in cultural institutions in the face of the challenges of nationalist populism, migration and political instability. The project is called Worlding Public Cultures: the Arts and Social Innovation and will work with university and museum partners in Canada (Carlton University and National Gallery of Canada), Germany (Heidleberg University and Institute for Cultural Inquiry, Berlin), Netherlands (Amsterdam University and Dutch Museum of World Cultures) and the UK (UAL and Tate Modern).

Statement

Professor Goodwin’s curatorial, research and writing projects extend across the interdisciplinary fields of contemporary art, urbanism, and exhibition making, with a particular but not exclusive focus on African diaspora artists and visual cultures. Within the wider field of contemporary art Goodwin’s research focuses on the dynamics of how processes of migration, globalisation and transnationalism have the potential to yield new and innovative artistic and curatorial practices in both a European and broader international context. Goodwin recently contributed to the major EU funded research project MeLa – European Museums in an Age of Migration - co-curating a summative research exhibition at MACBA Barcelona in July 2014 and co-editing the book Transfigurations: Curatorial and Artistic Research in an Age of Migrations (Royal College of Art/MeLa Publications, 2014) with Victoria Walsh and Pamela Sepulveda. Professor Goodwin is currently developing two main projects: Ways of Non-Seeing: Opacity and (In)Visibility in Global Art Practices (provisional title) a research and curatorial collaboration with Dr Federica Martina of the École de Design et Haute École d’Art du Valais (Édhéa), Switzerland. The project will explore how artists without work, gestures based on silence, withdrawal and refusal have inscribed within contemporary art practices several forms of (im)materialism and ‘invisibility’. Case studies in Europe, Africa, Middle East (Palestine); and Worlding Public Cultures: the Arts and Social Innovation (see above).

Owen Hopkins

Network member

Profile

Owen Hopkins is Senior Curator at Sir John Soane’s Museum where he leads the exhibitions and learning teams. Prior to that he was curator of the architecture programme at the Royal Academy of Arts. His interests revolve around the interactions between architecture, politics, technology and society. He is curator of numerous exhibitions including most recently Eric Parry: Drawing (2019), Code Builder (with Mamou-Mani Architects), Out of Character (with Studio MUTT), The Return of the Past: Postmodernism in British Architecture (all 2018) and Adam Nathaniel Furman: The Roman Singularity (2017). A frequent commentator on architecture in the press, he is author of five books, including Lost Futures (2017), Mavericks (2016) and From the Shadows (2015). In addition he is editor of four volumes/series of essays, including a special issue of AD and Year Zero, a collaboration with Machine Books. Alongside various exhibition projects, he is currently working on a major visual survey of postmodern architecture.

Statement

Working at the Soane, a place that before I arrived had a kind of mythical status in my mind, as it has for so many others, has revealed how even the most rarefied architecture can become everyday. This has led me into the curatorial position of developing ways of making exhibitions that give viewers the tools to see the mundane buildings that comprise the vast majority of their experience of architecture in the city as also on display in some way: that is, encourage them to use the heightened perception and critical perspectives that they deploy in their exploration of the Soane Museum in their everyday experience of architecture. However, for a curator of architecture the question remains of how to depict the ways architecture is used and its broader social, economic and political effects, which inherently resist representation. One of outcomes of this project I most interested in is how an interdisciplinary perspective and discussion might reframe and even answer this question.

Roger Kneebone

Network member

Profile

Roger Kneebone is a clinician and educationalist who leads the Centre for Engagement and Simulation Science at Imperial College London and the Royal College of Music–Imperial Centre for Performance Science. His multidisciplinary research into contextualised simulation and embodied knowledge builds on his personal experience as a surgeon and a general practitioner and his interest in domains of expertise beyond medicine. In addition to his work with Imperial scientists and clinicians, Roger collaborates with the Victoria & Albert Museum, Science Museum, Natural History Museum and the Royal College of Art. In 2017 he became the first Honorary Fellow of the City and Guilds of London Art School and is a member of the Art Workers Guild. He is the 2018 Gresham College Visiting Professor of Medical Education and in 2019 became the fourteenth Royal Academy of Arts Professor of Anatomy. Roger presents Countercurrent, a fortnightly iTunes podcast featuring 40-minute conversations with people whose interests and careers cross disciplinary boundaries.

Statement

Roger’s research focuses on ‘doing’, that embodied knowing on which expert practice depends. The worlds of medicine and science are suffused with ‘invisible’ practices. These ways of knowing and of doing often lie beyond conscious awareness, residing in individual and collective actions that defy verbal articulation. Performance and craftsmanship are as important in the operating theatre, the chemistry laboratory and the biomedical research group as they are in the sculptor’s studio, the jeweller’s workshop or on the concert platform. Yet such ways of knowing often go unnoticed by practitioners and observers alike. A recent symposium (‘The Art of Performing Science’) at Imperial College London with experts from diverse fields has disclosed numerous points of connection between apparently unrelated disciplines, highlighting the challenges of bringing the invisible into view and communicating what is most difficult to articulate.

Reina Lewis

Network member

Profile

Reina Lewis is Centenary Professor of Cultural Studies at the London College of Fashion, University of the Arts London. Her books include: Muslim Fashion: Contemporary Style Cultures (2015); Rethinking Orientalism: Women, Travel and the Ottoman Harem (2004): and Gendering Orientalism: Race, Femininity and Representation (1996): Modest Fashion: Styling Bodies, Mediating Faith, (ed. 2013); Styling South Asian Youth Cultures: Fashion, Media, Society (ed. 2018 with Lipi Begum and Rohit K. Dasgupta); The Poetics and Politics of Place: Ottoman Istanbul and British Orientalism (ed. 2010 with Zeynep Inankur and Mary Roberts); Gender, Modernity and Liberty: Middle Eastern and Western Women’s Writings: A Critical Reader (ed. 2006 with Nancy Micklewright); Feminist Postcolonial Theory: A Reader (ed. 2003 with Sara Mills); Outlooks: Lesbian and Gay Visual Cultures (ed.1996 with Peter Horne). Reina was consulting curator for the exhibition Contemporary Muslim Fashions, at the Fine Art Museums of San Francisco in 2018 (touring to Frankfurt 2019) and is co-editor of the accompanying book with Jill D’Allesandro.

Reina Lewis is also editor with Elizabeth Wilson of the book series Dress Cultures, and with Teresa Heffernan of the book series Cultures in Dialogue.

Reina is a frequent media commentator – most recently for the New York Times, le Monde, BBC World, BBC Radio, CBC radio, The Guardian, The Times, Marie-Claire magazine, Elle Brazil, Businessoffashion.com, Fortune.com, and Huffington Post.

Reina Lewis convenes the public talk series Faith and Fashion at the London College of Fashion, see

Statement

For the last several years, I have been using fashion and faith as a lens to explore the articulation of contemporary religious and ethnic gendered identities in Euro-America and the Middle East.  I have focused on the modest fashion industry and media as a cross-faith phenomenon that includes also Christian and Jewish women, ‘secular’ women, and those from other religious traditions. I have become especially interested in the how modest fashion cultural politics have played a role in women’s cross-faith social activism in defence of women’s rights to freedom of religious expression through dress, and the opportunities and tensions this produces. These studies of how religion intersects with ethnicity, race, gender and sexuality in the 21st century build on my earlier historical research on orientalism and gender in the context of western attitudes to Muslim cultures, allowing me to track patterns of continuity and change in how orientalist and imperial stereotypes were circulated and resisted.

Susan Tallman

Network member

Profile

Susan Tallman is an art historian and Editor-in-Chief of the journal and website Art in Print. She has written extensively on the history and culture of the print, as well as on issues of authenticity and replication. For several years she has also conducted research on the life of the 19th-century painter and spiritualist Anna Mary Howitt. Her books include The Contemporary Print: from Pre-Pop to Postmodern (Thames and Hudson),The Collections of Barbara Bloom (Steidl). Most recently she co-authored the catalogue for the British Museum exhibition, The American Dream: Pop to the Present. Her writing has appeared in New York Review of Books, Art in America, Parkett, Arts Magazine and many museum catalogues. An ex-New Yorker, she currently lives in Berlin and Chicago, where she also teaches in the Department of Art History, Theory and Criticism at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Statement

Investigating invisibility is the job of art historians in two respects: the first task, faced by all historians, is that of filling in the lacunae between spots of data—making educated guesses or imaginative leaps about what happened off record or beyond the edge of the photograph. The second, specific to the discipline, arises from the fact that most artists set themselves the task of picturing the not-visible, whether in the form of gods, the afterlife, inner life, or conceptual structures. In attempting to shed light on past pursuits of the invisible, art historians must look beyond visual objects into disciples as diverse as medicine, politics, psychiatry, forensics and poetics.

For several years I have been researching the life and work of Anna Mary Howitt (1824–1884), who after achieving success as a painter and writer, suffered a psychological and physical break and withdrew into spiritualism. Though her paintings were exhibited, reviewed and collected, almost none have survived; she has become an artist of invisible works known only through verbal description. Rediscovered by feminist art historians in the 1980s, Howitt has been treated as something of a martyr: her breakdown was said to have been caused by a dismissive letter from John Ruskin (though her own account suggests epilepsy). What remains are her books and hundreds of ‘spirit drawings,’ made over the course of three decades. These range from chaotic pencil sketches to highly mannered, tightly scripted gouaches and watercolours in which she articulates a complex matriarchal cosmology. Was she mad or visionary? Beaten down by the patriarchy or poisoned by lead plumbing? Or did she ‘see’ something important the rest of the world missed? Answering these questions requires expertise and methodologies beyond the traditions of art history.

Tanja Staehler

Network member

Profile

Tanja Staehler is Professor of European Philosophy at the University of Sussex and Co-Director (with Paul Davies) of the Centre for Literature and Philosophy. In her work, she focuses on the beginning of philosophy, the relation between philosophy and art, and philosophy of the body. She has published several monographs, including Plato, Levinas, and the Ambiguous Out-Side of Ethics (2010) as well as Hegel, Husserl, and the Phenomenology of Historical Worlds (2016). She has published articles on phenomenological method, dance theatre, literature, pregnancy, and childbirth.

Statement

Already Plato considered the relation between philosophy and art crucial. When Plato discusses the significance of ideas (or Forms) which are precisely not visible, it is nonetheless only through allegories about visibility that he can show the invisible to us. European Philosophy is torn between the revelatory power of art and a suspicion against vision, based on its dominance among the senses. Is there any way to approach the invisible as invisible? One concrete form of the invisibility is pregnancy which is pictured through ultrasound, yet experienced mostly through touch. Artists like Cindy Sherman and Louise Bourgeois invite us to explore the invisible with respect to the human body. Philosophers Maurice Merleau-Ponty and Martin Heidegger approach the invisible under the headings of flesh, earth, and the elements.

Irene Tracey

Network member

Profile

Professor Irene Tracey holds the Nuffield Chair of Anaesthetic Science and is Head of the Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences at the University of Oxford – a 550-person world-leading basic and clinical research department. Irene was a founding member of the Centre for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain (FMRIB – now Wellcome Centre for Integrative Neuroimaging) and was its Director from 2005 until 2015. Over the past 20 years, her personal multidisciplinary research team has contributed to a better understanding of pain perception, pain relief and nociceptive processing within the injured and non-injured human central nervous system using advanced neuroimaging techniques and novel paradigm designs. More recently, they have been investigating the neural basis of altered states of consciousness induced by anaesthetic agents. Irene has served and continues to serve on many national and international committees, such as the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP), British Neuroscience Association, Lundbeck Brain Prize Committee and is currently appointed to the Council of the Medical Research Council. In 2008 she was awarded the triennial Patrick Wall Medal from the Royal College of Anaesthetists and in 2009 was made an FRCA for her contributions to the discipline. In 2015 she was elected a Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences and in 2017 won the Feldberg Foundation Prize followed in 2018 by the British Neuroscience Association’s Outstanding Contribution to Neuroscience award. In September 2019, she will become the Warden of Merton College, Oxford – a college dating back to 1264.

Roberto Trotta

Network member

Profile

Dr Roberto Trotta is a Reader in Astrophysics at Imperial College London, where he is also the Director of the Centre for Languages, Culture and Communication, responsible for delivering humanities and languages education to over 4000 students at Imperial. His research in cosmology aims at elucidating the nature of dark matter and dark energy in the cosmos, which together account for 95% of the contents of the universe and yet are --in a conventional sense-- invisible. Dr Trotta is an experienced science communicator, who develops novel ways of making abstract concepts in cosmology more tangible for the public at large, and seeks to make astronomy communication more inclusive. He has collaborated with chefs and human-machine interaction experts to design immersive experiences that convey cosmological ideas in a multi-sensory fashion. Dr Trotta is the recipient of numerous awards for his research, teaching and public engagement, including the Lord Kelvin Award of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, the Michelson Prize of Case Western Reserve University and the Chair George Lemaitre of the University of Louvain.  His award-winning first book for the public, "The Edge of the Sky” explains the Universe using only the most common 1,000 words in English.

Statement

Dr Trotta’s research in cosmology uses big data and sophisticated statistical methods to try and determine the properties of dark matter and dark energy. Like many other concepts in modern cosmology, dark matter and dark energy can appear disconnected from our everyday life, and too abstract and ephemerous to grasp. A major focus of Dr Trotta’s public engagement work has been to break down barriers to engagement by translating cosmological concepts into interactive, immersive and playful experiences. Picturing the invisible thus becomes an apt metaphor both for Dr Trotta’s research (where data science and mathematical modeling bridge the gap between astrophysical observations and their underlying “invisible” causes) and for his outreach efforts (where intangible concepts are brought to life in a memorable and surprising way). Dr Trotta is also interested in other disciplines’ view on cosmology, and in exploring the unexpected commonalities between astrophysical invisibles and those found in other fields.