Student Feedback at UAL

University of the Arts London is committed to working in partnership with students to improve the quality of our courses to ensure that you have the best possible experience.

Your feedback is crucial in helping us to improve your course, both while you are studying with us and for future students. There are a number of ways in which you can give us your feedback. 

  • Image of Jewellery Design student work by Emily Richardson ’Geometric Modern’, CSM. © Luke Potter
    Luke Potter

    Unit Evaluations

    Give feedback on your course units via a short online survey, helping us to make positive changes while you are studying with us.

  • Image of Jewellery Design Degree Show 2008, CSM. © Alys Tomlinson
    Alys Tomlinson

    Student Reps

    Give us your feedback through your Student Representatives or consider becoming one yourself.

  • Amanda Cox BA Fine Art printed canvas. Photography: © Alys Tomlinson.
    © Alys Tomlinson.

    Student Committees

    Student Reps attend college and university committees, where they can make sure your ideas and feedback reach the people who can bring about change.

  • Image of Jewellery Design, CSM © Alys Tomlinson
    Alys Tomlinson

    Course Quality

    Find out how students can be involved in improving the quality of the University's courses.

  • Image of student work, Tiphaine de Bodman, MA Communication Design 2007, CSM. © Alys Tomlinson
    Alys Tomlinson

    The National Student Survey

    The National Student Survey gives final year undergraduates the chance to tell us about their experiences of studying at UAL.

  • Image of glass design, student work by Sayuri Morio, CSM 2008. © Luke Potter
    Luke Potter

    Postgraduate Taught Experience Survey

    The PTES gives taught postgraduate students the chance to tell us about their experiences of studying at UAL.

The more constructive and useful your feedback is, the easier it is for the University to make improvements to your experience. How can you make sure that your feedback is as constructive and useful as possible?

Be specific

Avoid making vague comments like ‘the unit was good’, or ‘the seminar was rubbish’. This doesn’t tell the person reading your comments what makes you think this. Instead, explain what you felt was positive or negative. For example you might say:

‘I found the workshops really interesting, but the set reading was very challenging and it would have been good to discuss it more in class.’

Be realistic

Try to avoid comments that are unrealistic, like ‘the assessment should be scrapped’. Assessments are an essential way of measuring what you have learned, and helping you to improve your work in the future.

Instead, explain why you think there were problems with the assessment. For example you might say:

‘The brief wasn’t very clear so I wasted time at the beginning trying to work out what I needed to do.’

Focus on the issue, not the person

Avoid writing anything offensive or personal – your course leader will personally read the comments that you leave so think about how you would feel if you received negative feedback. Please be as respectful and as constructive as you can.

Instead, give details about any problems in order to help your course team understand. For example, you might say:

‘The photography session was difficult to follow as there were so many different techniques to grasp in such a short time.’

Suggest solutions

If you think something didn’t work, don’t just criticise, explain how you think it could be avoided or improved. This will help your course team to put your suggestions into practice. For example, you might say:

‘It would be helpful to have the hand-outs for the lectures in advance so that we could get an idea of the topic before the session.’

A big thank you to the Newcastle University for sharing their materials. Their webpage includes more information about Newcastle’s Module Evaluation system, including videos from staff and students about how student feedback is used.