Sigune Hamann

Reader - Art and Media Practice

Camberwell College of Arts

Biography

Sigune Hamann is an artist and Reader in Art and Media Practice at Camberwell College of Arts, University of the Arts London. Her work encompasses photography and video in multi-disciplinary collaborations. In photographs, videos, installations and online environments she explores the effects of time and perception on the construction of images.

Installations include photographic panoramic film-strips (Kunstraum Düsseldorf 2017, Durham Museum and Art Gallery 2013, ISEA, Istanbul Biennale 2011, Kunsthalle Mainz 2008, Gallery of Photography, Dublin 2008, Harris Museum, Preston 2005); wave (Wellcome Collections 2012), the walking up and down bit (BFI 2009) and Dinnerfor1 (British Council and transmediale Berlin 2005).

Hamann is currently working on a two-year interdisciplinary research project on perception and attention in Experimental Psychology at Oxford University with leading neuroscientist Kia Nobre. The first experiments were exhibited at the Ashmolean Museum early 2017.

Born in Frankfurt am Main, Hamann graduated from the University of the Arts Berlin before completing an MA (distinction) at the Royal College of Art, London, with a DAAD scholarship. She was awarded residencies at Delfina Studio Trust, Künstlerhaus Schloss Balmoral, the V&A and Tokyo Wonder Site. Hamann initiated and curated the symposium Stillness and Movement for Tate Modern and CCW Graduate School in 2010.

Hamann’s practice, research and teaching are closely interlinked. She develops cross-disciplinary projects and explores models of practice at the meeting point of art, design and science. She is a lecturer in BA Graphic Design at Camberwell College of Arts.

Educational projects include Changing Perception of Images, a CCW competition across all levels and disciplines for the Wellcome Collection Windows, resulting in 2 year public installations; Interpreting Objects with Camberwell Collection, NissenRichards Architects and the V&A, funded by Creativeworks London; Negotiating and inhabiting space with Tracey Waller and Lambeth Council; the Camberwell Book Prize with Duncan Woolwich, BA Photography and a new platform for arts/design and science students with Oxford University and Jonathan Kearney, MA Digital Arts Camberwell.

Research interests

Practice-based research on the role of attention, expectations, and memories in the process of seeing, the creative potential of new and old media, stillness and movement, narrative structures, direct address and the construction of personal space in public environments. 

Research statement

My work deals with the passing of time in the fixing and reading of images and the perception and recollection of events. This encompasses hybrid media forms including photography, video, sound and performative elements.
In photographic film-strips, video loops, installations and online environments I explore the effects of time and perception on the construction of images in our minds. This includes the changing relationships of stillness and movement, narrative structures, direct address and the creative potential of new and old media.

With rapid technological developments and the production of increasing numbers of images we are no longer reading images only as forms, as we used to do, but also experiencing them now as events, grouped, layered, fragmented, and changing over time. The conventions in seeing and processing information are changing across disciplines. My research involves methods of generating, processing and deconstructing images.

Following on from collaborations with the Wellcome Trust I currently research perception and attention in parallel with scientific research from neuroscience and experimental psychology at Oxford University. I explore how the playful experimental treatment and physical handling and viewing of images can test and shift our perception of ourselves and relating to others.

Selected research outputs