Sharon Tolaini-Sage

Profile image of Lecturer Contextual & Theoretical Studies, School of Design

Lecturer Contextual & Theoretical Studies, School of Design

London College of Communication

Biography

Sharon Tolaini-Sage has a diverse background, having begun by training as a fine art printmaker, going on to a degree in Italian language and literature, and then an MA in Creative Writing at UEA. She worked for some time in the commercial arts sector as a gallery manager and exhibitions coordinator for a London-based print gallery. She is an experienced editor and translator, contributing to the Cambridge Guide to Women’s Writing in English (1999) and editing a collection of journalism by Lorna Sage, entitled Good as Her Word (2003), before going on to lecture in Contextual and Theoretical Studies. She currently teaches across undergraduate courses in Animation, Games Design, Interaction Design Arts and Information and Interface Design. 

Research interests

Spoken, written and visual language, digital connectivity, masks and the performance of the self, fandom, gamification, participatory culture, transmedia storytelling.

Biography

Sharon Tolaini-Sage has a diverse background, having begun by training as a fine art printmaker, going on to a degree in Italian language and literature, and then an MA in Creative Writing at UEA. She worked for some time in the commercial arts sector as a gallery manager and exhibitions coordinator for a London-based print gallery. She is an experienced editor and translator, contributing to the Cambridge Guide to Women’s Writing in English (1999) and editing a collection of journalism by Lorna Sage, entitled Good as Her Word (2003), before going on to lecture in Contextual and Theoretical Studies. She currently teaches across undergraduate courses in Animation, Games Design, Interaction Design Arts and Information and Interface Design. 

Research interests

Spoken, written and visual language, digital connectivity, masks and the performance of the self, fandom, gamification, participatory culture, transmedia storytelling. 

Research statement

The ways in which technologies are altering our actions and affecting our understanding of our identities, political beliefs and social relationships provides fascinating material for research and debate. At the heart of this area of study are the ways in which we communicate, perform and fashion ourselves, demonstrating our allegiances to social groups through the endlessly nuanced and subtle language we use. None of this is new, and our self-fashioning can be connected to cultural practices of the past: authors and artists who had no experience of the digital world, enabling us to use these connections as lenses through which to examine contemporary cultural practice.