Hannah Rickards

Profile image of Hannah Rickards

Hannah Rickards

Lecturer in 4D Pathway BA Fine Art

Central Saint Martins

Biography

Hannah Rickards’ work deals with perception and its description; with how one can translate an encounter, be that with a sound, an object, a space or an image.

It is centred on the framing of description in language, gesture and sound. Key to her practice is the relationship between either temporary or permanent elements in a landscape and the perception of groups or individuals to a landscape as a whole, with the sites concerned being used as both a vantage point and a stage for examining our verbal, spatial and gestural relationship with our surroundings. The outcomes, be they video/audio installations or text-based works, are often edited or composed with clear musical structures in mind.

Rickards was the recipient of the Max Mara Art Prize for Women in 2008/9. A survey of her work was held at Modern Art Oxford in 2014. She has presented solo exhibitions at the Whitechapel Gallery, The Showroom, and the Fogo Island Gallery, Newfoundland. Her work has been exhibited at the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; Palais de Tokyo, Paris; Witte de With, Rotterdam and at the South London Gallery. 

Rickards is a recipient of the 2015 Philip Leverhulme Prize in Visual and Performing Arts.

Research interests

Moving image, sound, installation, the use of language in visual art, musical forms of composition, perception.

Research statement

Hannah Rickards' work deals with perception and its description; with how one can translate an encounter, be that with a sound, an object, a space or an image. It is centered on the framing of description in language, gesture and sound. To date, in particular, Rickards has explored the relationship between atmospheric phenomena and experience of them: a sound heard accompanying the aurora borealis, a remembered image of a mirage, a thunderclap re-performed by a musical ensemble in installation, video, text and sound works.

Key to her practice is the relationship between either temporary or permanent elements in a landscape and the perception of groups or individuals to a landscape as a whole. with the specific sites concerned being used as both a vantage point and a stage for examining our verbal, spatial and gestural relationship with our surroundings.

The works frequently start out as the consideration of a particularity or natural phenomenon; finding the point at which that particularity translates in to something, or can find a parallel in another form: for example, looking at the conditions that create a mirage in relation to the rear-projected moving image. This commonly arrives through a period of close research, working with groups or individuals.

The outcomes, be they video/audio installations or text-based works, are often then edited or composed with clear musical structures in mind. The forms of the installed work reflect the diagrammatic geometries of the occurrences they deal with, and their spatial and temporal arrangements are developed and considered from the outset.

Project awards, and grants

2015 Philip Leverhulme Prize in Visual and Performing Arts.

Selected research outputs