Dr Salomé Voegelin

Profile image of Reader in Sound Arts, Member of CRiSAP

Reader in Sound Arts, Member of CRiSAP

London College of Communication

Biography

Salomé Voegelin is an artist and writer engaged in listening as a socio-political practice of sound. Her work and writing deals with sound, the world sound makes, its aesthetic, social and political realities that are hidden by the persuasiveness of a visual point of view.

She is the author of Listening to Noise and Silence: Towards a Philosophy of Sound Art, Continuum, NY, 2010, and Sonic Possible Worlds: Hearing the Continuum of Sound, which was published by Bloomsbury in 2014 and is currently working on a third book for Bloomsbury, developing the socio-political strands laid bare in the previous two publications through 8 political essays on sound.

Other recent writing includes ‘Sound Words and Sonic Fictions: Writing the Ephemeral’in The Routledge Companion to Sounding Art edited byMarcel Cobussen, Barry Truax and Vincent Meelberg, Routledge 2016, ‘The critical agency of the ‘avatar-I’: accessing the silence of the inaudible’ in FourbyThree magazine, editor Christine Jakobson, and together with Thomas Gardner she has co-edited Colloquium: Music- Sound Art, ZeroBooks, John Hunt Publishing, 2016.

Voegelin co-convenes, Points of Listening, PoL, a monthly programme of workshops, activities and discussions based in and around London, together with Mark Peter Wright.

She works collaboratively with David Mollin (Mollin+Voegelin) in a practice that focuses on text and sound and establishes through written and spoken words conversations and reconfigurations of relationships and realities. 

Research interests

Sound, music, art, listening, politics, ethics, materiality/ immateriality, text, voice, performance.

Research statement

My current research foci include listening and hearing as a socio-political practice and the pursuit of a philosophy of sound; the comparison and evaluation of listening across arts, humanities, science and technology disciplines; the reconsideration of curatorial strategies and conventions via the sonic possibility to uncurate; as well as the relationship between sound art and music.

The political ideas of listening and hearing are established through the notion of listening as inhabiting the acoustic environment or the sound artwork as a world. This position grants access to the invisible and ephemeral dynamic of sound and reveals how its dark and mobile plurality produces in passing and as plural possibilities what we think we see as stable and singular actualities.

My research in cross disciplinary listening is focused through an AHRC funded network project Listening across Disciplines which draws together auditory research initiatives and methods from across various disciplines to advance listening’s status and use.

And while my notion of uncurating sound is not an impetus against curating, or a deliberate non curating, the pretence of an anything goes, but an effort of decurating and recurating via a sonic sensibility and through a performative practice, I investigate the relationship between sound art and music in order to claim a neglected heritage and open up different references and connections for a contemporary consideration or sound art and music.

Students

Current students and thesis titles

Sunil Chandy, Drawing out the hidden pluralities in the ritual of the public reading of Christian Scripture through Sound Art Practice.

Julie Groves, Physical Composition: Investigating the notion of the physical as a compositional tool by defining the term and its use through creative practice.

Victoria Karlsson, Mapping Experiences of Inner Sounds.

Kevin Logan, How to (Re)Do Things with Sounds: Mediating the Sonic-Deed.

Louise Marshall, Deep Listening: the strategic practice of female experimental composers post 1945.

Completed students and thesis titles

Mark Jackson, Nothing Short of Complete Liberation: The Burroughsian Ideal of Space as Curatorial Strategy in Audial Art.

Iris Garrelfs, From inputs to outputs: an investigation of process in sound art practice.

Mark Peter Wright, Contact Zones and Elsewhere Fields: The Poetics and Politics of Environmental Sound Arts.

Project awards, and grants

2016-17, Listening across Disciplines, AHRC funded network Project, PI in conjunction with CO-I Anna Barney, Professor in Bioacoustic medical engeneering at Southampton University. £33688.25.

Selected research outputs