IIH Research

The Innovation Insights Hub undertakes action-oriented, cross-disciplinary research combining the expertise of UAL with the visions, needs and capacities of its partners and the communities they work with. Its projects are agile, creative and oriented towards achieving impact.

Reimagining Adult Social Care

What it is

An occasional series of sprint workshops to connect designers, researchers, entrepreneurs, systems changers and local authorities to generate concepts for future services caring for older people.

Why it matters

Adult social care is in crisis in the UK. Demographic changes, funding cuts, health conditions such as dementia, growing recognition of the role of loneliness and other factors are resulting in policy, service delivery and personal challenges affecting millions of people. There is increasing attention being paid to the care crisis in the form of research, funding and entrepreneurial activity. However there are new opportunities to address these challenges from the perspective of people’s experiences, combining technology (e.g. distributed data gathering and analysis shaping service delivery), research (e.g. understanding of behaviour change to support older people’s wellbeing) and social practices (e.g. informal and formal caring networks).

Who’s involved  

Local authorities, technology innovators working on ageing, designers, researchers

Outputs

Report from first sprint workshop coming soon. 

Find out more

Get in touch with the Hub.   

Arts and humanities into policy making

What it is

A bottom-up initiative to bring research from the arts and humanities to policy makers inside government. It involves a series of workshops in which arts and humanities researchers engage with civil servants involved in policy making. The first speed dating workshop was held in December attended by 11 researchers and seven policy officials from the Cabinet Office social action team around the question “How can the resilience and capacity of communities be maximised so that they are able to survive, adapt and grow despite chronic stresses and acute shocks?” The next workshops are now being planned.

Why it matters

The Open Policy Making Agenda recognizes that policy officials need to draw on a wide range of sources of evidence when making and delivering policy. Much of this evidence is based in economic and social research. This initiative recognizes the expertise and contributions of researchers from the arts and humanities and develops ways for policy officials to access this. It also enables academics to understand more about the nature of policy work and where their current or future research might contribute to this.

Who’s involved  

  • Arts and humanities researchers
  • Cabinet Office
  • AHRC
  • Institute for Government

Outputs

Visit the Open Policy Blog

Find out more

Get in touch with the Hub.