Technical Drawing For Theatre, Film Or Television Designers

The key to produce good, professional technical drawings is simply using common sense in the way structures are represented in line, coupled with an awareness of the basic 'conventions' (standard accepted practice) for theatre, film and television drafting...

Taught by: David Neat.

Description

The key to produce good, professional technical drawings is simply using common sense in the way structures are represented in line, coupled with an awareness of the basic 'conventions' (standard accepted practice) for theatre, film and television drafting. This course focuses on traditional hand-drawing using pencil, drafting paper and drawing-board and practical guidance is given on how to work with these tools.

In addition, the course also aims to bridge the divide between these methods (still the best in terms of a true engagement with the design process) and computer-aided drawing by using Google SketchUp as the principle exercise tool throughout the week.

Topics covered

The purposes of technical drawings: Who uses designers' drawings and how.

Thinking and working in scale:  Choice of scale and sheet size appropriate to the task; metric and imperial comparison; using a scale ruler; consideration of how detailed should drawings be.

Laying out the parts of a drawing: What a standard 'orthographic' drawing consists of; rehearsing the layout; lining up drawn views; how much to include on one sheet.

Lines: How and when to vary line 'weight'; 'hidden' lines describing structures outside the drawing viewpoint; when to use other dashed lines; how to indicate movement.

Written information: Accepted ways of writing measurements; labels, title block and notes; ads for lettering, coding (i.e. linking) drawn views.

Ground-plan, elevation and section: What should be included on the ground plan; how much of the stage, theatre or studio should be included with it; how to indicate steps and levels; indicating surfaces such as brickwork, tiles and glazing; when sections are necessary and how to indicate them on groundplan or elevations.

The teaching approach is based on a number of years teaching technical drawing on undergraduate design courses. Apart from anything else this experience has provided me with a very clear idea of the 'grey' areas i.e. those which often pose most difficulty or are least understood.

Who should take this course?

  • those who have either done little or no technical drawing before
  • students who have experienced difficulty and need a clear, explained approach
  • those who have had some experience but would like a refresher

This course is an ideal follow-on from either the 'Set Design for Film and Television' or 'Set Design for Performance' course

   

Tutor information

David Neat trained and practiced as a theatre designer for a number of years before concentrating on his own sculptural work. He now regularly tutors BA degree students in design-related skills such as model-making or technical drawing, especially for theatre, film and television. He is an Associate Lecturer at more than five London design colleges and a Visiting Lecturer across the country and abroad. He regularly runs his own courses in both model-making and sculptural techniques. He is author of the popular book 'Model-making: Materials and Methods'.


Materials

Please bring with you to the first session:

  • Laptop or notebook with free copy of Google SketchUp (not SketchUp Pro!) installed, mains cable and mouse.
  • Any students who have portable parallel motion drawing boards can bring them in.
  • Mechanical drawing pencil (0.5) with HB, H and 2B leads. Soft eraser. Set square (20-30cm)
  • Scale rule including 1:25 scale 
  • 30cm flat metal ruler
  • Regular compass

 


Details for booking

Alternative Dates and Times

If no dates are showing then please 'Enquire about this course' using the link below and we will contact you when new dates are published.